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Maximum eyeglass prescription?

 
 
Lee
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      09-16-2007, 02:26 AM
I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?

I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
(both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
does.

Thanks.

 
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p.clarkii@gmail.com
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      09-16-2007, 05:07 AM
On Sep 15, 10:26 pm, Lee <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
> year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
> presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
> astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
> year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
> eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?


there is no maximum prescription. lenses can be made to compensate
for just about any degree of myopia, astigmatism, or hyperopia so that
your eye can see 20/20 with them on (provided they are healthy and you
are too). do not worry. practically speaking there will always be
lenses available that will work for you.

indeed, it is rather unusual for someone your age to have near
problems and need progressive lenses (I am an optometrist) who has
significant presbyopia symptoms until about age 40 especially if they
are myopic. like MT said in his post, I believe you are having an
accommodation problem, possibly spasms or pseudomyopia. I would
suggest a cycloplegic refraction using cyclopentolate (or stronger)
drops.

I wonder also if you have binocular vision problems. do you ever have
double vision (e.g. when you are tired, or driving at night)? Do your
eyes occasionally cross, or feel like they are about to cross? Do you
ever get headaches, particularly after prolonged reading or near work?

> I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
> and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
> numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
> the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
> the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
> because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
> (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
> get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
> does.
>
> Thanks.


 
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Mark A
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      09-16-2007, 05:35 AM
"Lee" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
>I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
> year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
> presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
> astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
> year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
> eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?
>
> I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
> and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
> numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
> the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
> the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
> because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
> (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
> get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
> does.
>
> Thanks.


-6.5 is moderately high, but some people have -12.00 and higher. However, if
you need more than -12.00 it is harder to find a lens (some people wear
contacts and glasses if their Rx get extremely strong).

You astigmatism is usually expressed as a minus power which you did not
state. The 007 and 133 are degrees which relate to the position off the
cylinder correction and has no correlation of how strong the astigmatism is
(that would be the cylinder power).

Actually, I am not sure if you have progressives or the +2.00 is your
astigmatism (cylinder power)? When cylinder is expressed as a +2.00 (instead
of a minus) then that changes the equivalent sphere power when comparing a
lens to a minus astigmatism.

What lens brand and model do you have? That will tell whether you actually
have progressives. If you are not sure, ask the person who dispensed your
lenses (if not written on your receipt).


 
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L. Ron Waddle
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      09-16-2007, 05:40 AM
Lee wrote:
> I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
> year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
> presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and'


Hmm, usually people do not need to be told they have issues with
accomodation and presbyopia. They can tell by themselves because they
start having to take their glasses off to see things up close, or have
trouble reading. I basically told my optometrist that I was having
trouble seeing up close and probably needed bifocals, she didn't tell
me. Granted, normal screening would have also detected it, but my point
was that I didn't need screening to know this, it was pretty obvious
that I was having reading difficulties pre-screening.

One question I do have is whether you were dilated when this finding was
made. When I was dilated, it caused my left eye to refract worse than it
normally does, causing the optometrist to issue a higher prescription. I
am not sure what the exact mechanism is or why this happened, but I do
know that glasses issued in the new prescription were quite obviously
wrong when I put them on over undilated pupils and when I was
re-refracted undilated, my left eye was back to its normal power.

> I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
> and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism



High index lenses can accomodate you fairly well for quite some time, my
brother's eyes were past -9 before his retinas detached and his glasses
were quite obviously thick but still usable backup for his contact
lenses. As others mention, due to the thickness of lenses at those
powers, glasses are heavy and cumbersome and used mostly as a backup to
contacts at those powers. However, at your age it is quite unlikely
you'll ever reach those levels, my brother was there by age 18 and his
first detachment was before age 30.

Insofar as eye health issues, extreme myopia is associated with
increased risk of retinal detachment, with myopia lower than -8 being a
particularly bad risk factor. The good news is that if you get surgery
immediately to re-attach the retina, sufficient sight can usually be
saved to continue a normal life. I would not, at your age, worry much
about blindness, just keep an eye out (pun intended) for the typical
signs of retinal detachment and if you detect ANY of them, immediately
go to your opthamologist. If you do not currently have an opthamologist
I suggest that you get one. That said, given the information you've
given us (you do not indicate that either of your parents or anybody
else in your family has experienced retinal detachment or blindness), I
wouldn't worry *TOO* much about it. You have a risk factor that needs to
be considered, but it isn't a high one.

-Elron
 
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lena102938
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      09-16-2007, 09:38 PM
On Sep 16, 12:07 am, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> On Sep 15, 10:26 pm, Lee <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
> > shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
> > year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
> > presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
> > astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
> > year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
> > eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?

>
> there is no maximum prescription. lenses can be made to compensate
> for just about any degree of myopia, astigmatism, or hyperopia so that
> your eye can see 20/20 with them on (provided they are healthy and you
> are too). do not worry. practically speaking there will always be
> lenses available that will work for you.
>
> indeed, it is rather unusual for someone your age to have near
> problems and need progressive lenses


Yes
Because the doctor say so

 
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lena102938
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      09-16-2007, 09:41 PM
On Sep 15, 9:26 pm, Lee <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
> year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
> presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
> astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
> year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
> eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?
>
> I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
> and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
> numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
> the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
> the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
> because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
> (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
> get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
> does.
>
> Thanks.


Progressives spoil the vision tremendously.
They "turn off accomodation"
Try to switch to byfocals with "lines" , pleace

 
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Neil Brooks
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      09-16-2007, 09:42 PM
On Sep 16, 2:38 pm, lena102938 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Yes
> Because the doctor say so


Sorry. Rishi Giovanni Gatti (Zetsu) and Otis Brown are
long-time trolls who haunt s.m.v.

Lena102938 aspires to troll status based primarily upon her
constant use of anti-eye doctor rhetoric as a
substitute for any actual information.

You'd do well to ignore them and wait for
responses from the caring, compassionate eye doctors who
DO also participate in this site.

 
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Dr Judy
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      09-16-2007, 09:45 PM
On Sep 15, 10:26 pm, Lee <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
> year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
> presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
> astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
> year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
> eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?


There is no maximm, lenses can be made in any power. The most I have
seen is -30.00


> I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
> and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
> numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
> the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
> the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
> because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
> (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
> get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
> does.


Your myopia is moderate. The astigmatism number you gave is the axis,
not the power, is the power the +2.00?

Needing bifocals at age 33 is unusual. Do you have binocular
problems, glaucoma or diabetes? They can cause a need for bifocals
or early presbyopia.

No one ever goes blind or loses sight simply due to myopia. Blindness
is the result of eye disease, not needing glasses.

Dr Judy

 
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Dan Abel
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      09-17-2007, 02:54 PM
In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
Lee <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
> year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
> presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
> astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
> year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
> eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?
>
> I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
> and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
> numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
> the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
> the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
> because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
> (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
> get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
> does.



I can't imagine that a person would lose their sight due to being
nearsighted. I would strongly urge you to consider contacts. Many
people who are strongly nearsighted find that contacts work better than
glasses. The nice thing about contacts is that if they don't work, or
you just don't like them, then you just stop using them. You are out
nothing more than a little money and some time. I wore contacts, with
OTC reading glasses over them for close work, for ten years.
 
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L. Ron Waddle
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      09-17-2007, 04:11 PM
lena102938 wrote:
> On Sep 15, 9:26 pm, Lee <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
>> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last


> Progressives spoil the vision tremendously.
> They "turn off accomodation"
> Try to switch to byfocals with "lines" , pleace


Just in case someone actually believes this, peer reviewed research
published in credible journals show no difference in progression of
myopia between young people wearing progressive lenses and young people
wearing single-vision lenses. Progressive lenses are nasty if you use a
computer, literally a pain in the neck (since you must keep moving your
head to focus properly on the different areas of the screen), and many
people have problems adapting to them, but criticisms of them tend to be
from the same sorts who believe the old wive's tale of "you'll hurt your
eyes if you keep reading so much!". (Which explains why I, who have read
probably 60,000 books since age 6, have better vision than my brother,
who reads only when forced to do so, hmm?).

Regarding "turn off accomodation", I don't know anybody who would use
progressives if their accomodative function was working properly. If
you're using progressives, it's because your accomodation isn't working.
You can't "spoil" something that isn't there.

Note: lena102938 is a USENET troll/kook and further replies to him/her
are not warranted. This message is intended for people other than the
troll/kook who might be confused. Replies from lena102938 will be ignored.
 
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