Contact lens exam from Optometrist and/or Ophthalmologist

Discussion in 'Contact Lenses' started by sclind@gmail.com, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. Guest

    I need to have an annual exam for glaucoma, so I just completed a visit
    to my ophthalmologist. He gave me a complete eye exam and gave me my
    eyeglass prescription.

    When I asked about getting the prescription for my contacts, he said
    I'd have to see an optometrist (presumably the one in his office) to
    get that; that it was a different exam. I asked if I would save some
    money since I already had an eye exam (I have to assume the exams are
    at least similar), and the answer was no.

    In all the time I've had contacts, I've never had to go to two
    different doctors. Is this a new way of operating (I'm in Illinois),
    or just a way for the MD to generate revenue for an affiliate?

    Scott
     
    , Nov 4, 2005
    #1
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  2. Dr. Leukoma Guest

    It's called "specialization."

    It is a different CPT code. The glaucoma exam is a 99*** code, whereas
    the contact lens fitting is a 92*** code. These are the codes that are
    submitted to the insurance companies for billing.

    DrG
     
    Dr. Leukoma, Nov 4, 2005
    #2
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  3. Dom Guest

    wrote:
    > I need to have an annual exam for glaucoma, so I just completed a visit
    > to my ophthalmologist. He gave me a complete eye exam and gave me my
    > eyeglass prescription.
    >
    > When I asked about getting the prescription for my contacts, he said
    > I'd have to see an optometrist (presumably the one in his office) to
    > get that; that it was a different exam. I asked if I would save some
    > money since I already had an eye exam (I have to assume the exams are
    > at least similar), and the answer was no.
    >
    > In all the time I've had contacts, I've never had to go to two
    > different doctors. Is this a new way of operating (I'm in Illinois),
    > or just a way for the MD to generate revenue for an affiliate?
    >
    > Scott
    >


    Ophthalmologists specialise in eye disease, optometrists specialise in
    vision. There's a lot of overlap, but you'll get the best result if you
    go to the 'specialist'. So see your ophthalmologist for glaucoma and see
    your optometrist for contacts.

    It may be that the optometrist doesn't like to use the eye exam from the
    ophthalmologist because as far as the success of contacts is concerned,
    the buck stops with him/her so he wants to start from scratch with the
    measurements etc. This is certainly how I operate if someone comes to me
    wanting contacts, even though they've just had another eye exam
    somewhere else recently... I would start from scratch.

    Dom
     
    Dom, Nov 5, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Dom -

    Thanks for the advice. I certainly understand what you're saying,
    especially if the patient just came in with a eye exam of questionable
    reliability.

    But with these two Doctor's working together, it seems there ought to
    be some way to help out the patient as far as the cost of the eye exam
    is concerned.

    Scott
     
    , Nov 7, 2005
    #4
  5. Dr. Leukoma Guest


    > Let the MDs do the medical and let the ODs do the vision refractions!
    >



    Or just let the OD do both, which is what they are trained to do.
    Otherwise you're wasting money.

    DrG
     
    Dr. Leukoma, Nov 13, 2005
    #5
  6. Dan Abel Guest

    In article <>,
    "Dr. Leukoma" <> wrote:

    > > Let the MDs do the medical and let the ODs do the vision refractions!
    > >

    >
    >
    > Or just let the OD do both, which is what they are trained to do.
    > Otherwise you're wasting money.



    Just curious. Do you treat glaucoma?

    I don't know where you are at. In California, where I live, an OD can
    get a special license to prescribe medicine. My private practice OD did
    this.

    --
    Dan Abel

    Petaluma, California, USA
     
    Dan Abel, Nov 13, 2005
    #6
  7. Dr. Leukoma Guest

    Yes, I treat glaucoma, and everything else covered under my license,
    including orals.

    DrG
     
    Dr. Leukoma, Nov 14, 2005
    #7
  8. Dan Abel Guest

    In article <iQOdf.8884$>,
    "Mike Tyner" <> wrote:

    > "Dan Abel" <> wrote
    >
    > > I don't know where you are at. In California, where I live, an OD can
    > > get a special license to prescribe medicine. My private practice OD did
    > > this.

    >
    > Every state licenses optometrists to prescribe, to some degree.



    Interesting. My OD made a big point of the fact that he took the
    training, took the test, passed the test and got the special license. I
    really don't know any other details.

    --
    Dan Abel

    Petaluma, California, USA
     
    Dan Abel, Nov 14, 2005
    #8
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