Maximum eyeglass prescription?

Discussion in 'Glasses' started by Lee, Sep 16, 2007.

  1. Lee

    Lee Guest

    I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
    year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
    presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
    astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
    year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
    eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?

    I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
    and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
    numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
    the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
    the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
    because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
    (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
    get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
    does.

    Thanks.
     
    Lee, Sep 16, 2007
    #1
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  2. Lee

    Guest

    On Sep 15, 10:26 pm, Lee <> wrote:
    > I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
    > year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
    > presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
    > astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
    > year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
    > eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?


    there is no maximum prescription. lenses can be made to compensate
    for just about any degree of myopia, astigmatism, or hyperopia so that
    your eye can see 20/20 with them on (provided they are healthy and you
    are too). do not worry. practically speaking there will always be
    lenses available that will work for you.

    indeed, it is rather unusual for someone your age to have near
    problems and need progressive lenses (I am an optometrist) who has
    significant presbyopia symptoms until about age 40 especially if they
    are myopic. like MT said in his post, I believe you are having an
    accommodation problem, possibly spasms or pseudomyopia. I would
    suggest a cycloplegic refraction using cyclopentolate (or stronger)
    drops.

    I wonder also if you have binocular vision problems. do you ever have
    double vision (e.g. when you are tired, or driving at night)? Do your
    eyes occasionally cross, or feel like they are about to cross? Do you
    ever get headaches, particularly after prolonged reading or near work?

    > I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
    > and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
    > numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
    > the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
    > the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
    > because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
    > (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
    > get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
    > does.
    >
    > Thanks.
     
    , Sep 16, 2007
    #2
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  3. Lee

    Mark A Guest

    "Lee" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
    > year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
    > presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
    > astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
    > year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
    > eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?
    >
    > I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
    > and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
    > numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
    > the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
    > the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
    > because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
    > (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
    > get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
    > does.
    >
    > Thanks.


    -6.5 is moderately high, but some people have -12.00 and higher. However, if
    you need more than -12.00 it is harder to find a lens (some people wear
    contacts and glasses if their Rx get extremely strong).

    You astigmatism is usually expressed as a minus power which you did not
    state. The 007 and 133 are degrees which relate to the position off the
    cylinder correction and has no correlation of how strong the astigmatism is
    (that would be the cylinder power).

    Actually, I am not sure if you have progressives or the +2.00 is your
    astigmatism (cylinder power)? When cylinder is expressed as a +2.00 (instead
    of a minus) then that changes the equivalent sphere power when comparing a
    lens to a minus astigmatism.

    What lens brand and model do you have? That will tell whether you actually
    have progressives. If you are not sure, ask the person who dispensed your
    lenses (if not written on your receipt).
     
    Mark A, Sep 16, 2007
    #3
  4. Lee wrote:
    > I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
    > year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
    > presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and'


    Hmm, usually people do not need to be told they have issues with
    accomodation and presbyopia. They can tell by themselves because they
    start having to take their glasses off to see things up close, or have
    trouble reading. I basically told my optometrist that I was having
    trouble seeing up close and probably needed bifocals, she didn't tell
    me. Granted, normal screening would have also detected it, but my point
    was that I didn't need screening to know this, it was pretty obvious
    that I was having reading difficulties pre-screening.

    One question I do have is whether you were dilated when this finding was
    made. When I was dilated, it caused my left eye to refract worse than it
    normally does, causing the optometrist to issue a higher prescription. I
    am not sure what the exact mechanism is or why this happened, but I do
    know that glasses issued in the new prescription were quite obviously
    wrong when I put them on over undilated pupils and when I was
    re-refracted undilated, my left eye was back to its normal power.

    > I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
    > and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism



    High index lenses can accomodate you fairly well for quite some time, my
    brother's eyes were past -9 before his retinas detached and his glasses
    were quite obviously thick but still usable backup for his contact
    lenses. As others mention, due to the thickness of lenses at those
    powers, glasses are heavy and cumbersome and used mostly as a backup to
    contacts at those powers. However, at your age it is quite unlikely
    you'll ever reach those levels, my brother was there by age 18 and his
    first detachment was before age 30.

    Insofar as eye health issues, extreme myopia is associated with
    increased risk of retinal detachment, with myopia lower than -8 being a
    particularly bad risk factor. The good news is that if you get surgery
    immediately to re-attach the retina, sufficient sight can usually be
    saved to continue a normal life. I would not, at your age, worry much
    about blindness, just keep an eye out (pun intended) for the typical
    signs of retinal detachment and if you detect ANY of them, immediately
    go to your opthamologist. If you do not currently have an opthamologist
    I suggest that you get one. That said, given the information you've
    given us (you do not indicate that either of your parents or anybody
    else in your family has experienced retinal detachment or blindness), I
    wouldn't worry *TOO* much about it. You have a risk factor that needs to
    be considered, but it isn't a high one.

    -Elron
     
    L. Ron Waddle, Sep 16, 2007
    #4
  5. Lee

    lena102938 Guest

    On Sep 16, 12:07 am, wrote:
    > On Sep 15, 10:26 pm, Lee <> wrote:
    >
    > > I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > > shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
    > > year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
    > > presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
    > > astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
    > > year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
    > > eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?

    >
    > there is no maximum prescription. lenses can be made to compensate
    > for just about any degree of myopia, astigmatism, or hyperopia so that
    > your eye can see 20/20 with them on (provided they are healthy and you
    > are too). do not worry. practically speaking there will always be
    > lenses available that will work for you.
    >
    > indeed, it is rather unusual for someone your age to have near
    > problems and need progressive lenses


    Yes
    Because the doctor say so
     
    lena102938, Sep 16, 2007
    #5
  6. Lee

    lena102938 Guest

    On Sep 15, 9:26 pm, Lee <> wrote:
    > I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
    > year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
    > presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
    > astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
    > year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
    > eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?
    >
    > I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
    > and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
    > numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
    > the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
    > the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
    > because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
    > (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
    > get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
    > does.
    >
    > Thanks.


    Progressives spoil the vision tremendously.
    They "turn off accomodation"
    Try to switch to byfocals with "lines" , pleace
     
    lena102938, Sep 16, 2007
    #6
  7. Lee

    Neil Brooks Guest

    On Sep 16, 2:38 pm, lena102938 <> wrote:

    > Yes
    > Because the doctor say so


    Sorry. Rishi Giovanni Gatti (Zetsu) and Otis Brown are
    long-time trolls who haunt s.m.v.

    Lena102938 aspires to troll status based primarily upon her
    constant use of anti-eye doctor rhetoric as a
    substitute for any actual information.

    You'd do well to ignore them and wait for
    responses from the caring, compassionate eye doctors who
    DO also participate in this site.
     
    Neil Brooks, Sep 16, 2007
    #7
  8. Lee

    Dr Judy Guest

    On Sep 15, 10:26 pm, Lee <> wrote:
    > I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
    > year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
    > presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
    > astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
    > year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
    > eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?


    There is no maximm, lenses can be made in any power. The most I have
    seen is -30.00


    > I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
    > and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
    > numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
    > the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
    > the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
    > because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
    > (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
    > get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
    > does.


    Your myopia is moderate. The astigmatism number you gave is the axis,
    not the power, is the power the +2.00?

    Needing bifocals at age 33 is unusual. Do you have binocular
    problems, glaucoma or diabetes? They can cause a need for bifocals
    or early presbyopia.

    No one ever goes blind or loses sight simply due to myopia. Blindness
    is the result of eye disease, not needing glasses.

    Dr Judy
     
    Dr Judy, Sep 16, 2007
    #8
  9. Lee

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <>,
    Lee <> wrote:

    > I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
    > year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
    > presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
    > astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
    > year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
    > eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?
    >
    > I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
    > and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
    > numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
    > the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
    > the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
    > because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
    > (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
    > get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
    > does.



    I can't imagine that a person would lose their sight due to being
    nearsighted. I would strongly urge you to consider contacts. Many
    people who are strongly nearsighted find that contacts work better than
    glasses. The nice thing about contacts is that if they don't work, or
    you just don't like them, then you just stop using them. You are out
    nothing more than a little money and some time. I wore contacts, with
    OTC reading glasses over them for close work, for ten years.
     
    Dan Abel, Sep 17, 2007
    #9
  10. lena102938 wrote:
    > On Sep 15, 9:26 pm, Lee <> wrote:
    >> I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    >> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last


    > Progressives spoil the vision tremendously.
    > They "turn off accomodation"
    > Try to switch to byfocals with "lines" , pleace


    Just in case someone actually believes this, peer reviewed research
    published in credible journals show no difference in progression of
    myopia between young people wearing progressive lenses and young people
    wearing single-vision lenses. Progressive lenses are nasty if you use a
    computer, literally a pain in the neck (since you must keep moving your
    head to focus properly on the different areas of the screen), and many
    people have problems adapting to them, but criticisms of them tend to be
    from the same sorts who believe the old wive's tale of "you'll hurt your
    eyes if you keep reading so much!". (Which explains why I, who have read
    probably 60,000 books since age 6, have better vision than my brother,
    who reads only when forced to do so, hmm?).

    Regarding "turn off accomodation", I don't know anybody who would use
    progressives if their accomodative function was working properly. If
    you're using progressives, it's because your accomodation isn't working.
    You can't "spoil" something that isn't there.

    Note: lena102938 is a USENET troll/kook and further replies to him/her
    are not warranted. This message is intended for people other than the
    troll/kook who might be confused. Replies from lena102938 will be ignored.
     
    L. Ron Waddle, Sep 17, 2007
    #10
  11. Lee

    lena102938 Guest

    On Sep 17, 11:11 am, "L. Ron Waddle" <>
    wrote:
    > lena102938 wrote:
    > > On Sep 15, 9:26 pm, Lee <> wrote:
    > >> I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > >> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last

    > > Progressives spoil the vision tremendously.
    > > They "turn off accomodation"
    > > Try to switch to byfocals with "lines" , pleace

    >
    > Just in case someone actually believes this, peer reviewed research
    > published in credible journals show no difference in progression of
    > myopia between young people wearing progressive lenses and young people
    > wearing single-vision lenses. Progressive lenses are nasty if you use a
    > computer, literally a pain in the neck (since you must keep moving your
    > head to focus properly on the different areas of the screen), and many
    > people have problems adapting to them, but criticisms of them tend to be
    > from the same sorts who believe the old wive's tale of "you'll hurt your
    > eyes if you keep reading so much!". (Which explains why I, who have read
    > probably 60,000 books since age 6, have better vision than my brother,
    > who reads only when forced to do so, hmm?).
    >


    I bet, you skept H.C. Andersen
     
    lena102938, Sep 17, 2007
    #11
  12. Lee

    Neil Brooks Guest

    On Sep 17, 9:11 am, "L. Ron Waddle" <>
    wrote:
    > lena102938 wrote:
    > > On Sep 15, 9:26 pm, Lee <> wrote:
    > >> I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > >> shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last

    > > Progressives spoil the vision tremendously.
    > > They "turn off accomodation"
    > > Try to switch to byfocals with "lines" , pleace

    >
    > Just in case someone actually believes this, peer reviewed research
    > published in credible journals show no difference in progression of
    > myopia between young people wearing progressive lenses and young people
    > wearing single-vision lenses. Progressive lenses are nasty if you use a
    > computer, literally a pain in the neck (since you must keep moving your
    > head to focus properly on the different areas of the screen), and many
    > people have problems adapting to them, but criticisms of them tend to be
    > from the same sorts who believe the old wive's tale of "you'll hurt your
    > eyes if you keep reading so much!". (Which explains why I, who have read
    > probably 60,000 books since age 6, have better vision than my brother,
    > who reads only when forced to do so, hmm?).
    >
    > Regarding "turn off accomodation", I don't know anybody who would use
    > progressives if their accomodative function was working properly. If
    > you're using progressives, it's because your accomodation isn't working.
    > You can't "spoil" something that isn't there.
    >
    > Note: lena102938 is a USENET troll/kook and further replies to him/her
    > are not warranted. This message is intended for people other than the
    > troll/kook who might be confused. Replies from lena102938 will be ignored.


    Too, too true.

    She and Otis do seem to have a few things in common:

    - neither appears to think rationally or logically. They seem
    particularly fond, collectively, of hasty generalizations, straw man
    arguments, red herrings, and conflating correlation with causation;

    - each claims education and/or experience working in the sciences,
    but both display an abject disregard for actual evidence and the
    scientific method;

    - both seem to have a pathological hatred that stems from their own
    vision issues, leading both to long for somebody to blame. Each has
    chosen the vision care industry, at large as responsible for their
    shattered dreams or damnable eyeglasses, yet without a shred of actual
    evidence that any intervention caused their eye issues, or that any
    intervention could have prevented them;

    - both seem to have their minds TOTALLY made up, yet both have an
    awful grasp of very relevant facts, and/or mis-state (for their own
    agendas) facts presented to them;

    - neither seems to actually PROCESS new information, even when
    paraded in front of them;

    - Lena seems to have come to us BY WAY OF Otis and his website.
    Nothing could prove a more ignominious recommendation than that.

    Sad.

    Pathetic, really.
     
    Neil Brooks, Sep 17, 2007
    #12
  13. Lee

    Neil Brooks Guest

    Sorry. Rishi Giovanni Gatti (Zetsu), Lena102938, and Otis Brown are
    trolls who haunt s.m.v. Otis is pathologically
    dishonest and actually hurts people. Following his advice
    can induce double vision in those not working with an eye doctor.

    Lena102938 uses anti-eye doctor rhetoric as a substitute for any
    actual information. It seems she now has to wear glasses and has
    developed a pathological (and ILLOGICAL) resentment toward the
    industry
    that "foisted these glasses upon her."

    You'd do well to ignore them and wait for
    responses from the caring, compassionate eye doctors who
    DO also participate in this site.
     
    Neil Brooks, Sep 17, 2007
    #13
  14. Lee

    Lee Guest

    To follow up, I got my new glasses yesterday, Monday Sept. 16. They
    came with a handy little card showing my prescription. Due to my
    insurance, I have the Kodak Unique Lenses that are 1.6 Instashades
    evoclear gray. The dr. wanted me to have the transitions, anti-glare,
    progressive lenses. The right sph. is -6.75, cyl. -1.25, axis 177 and
    add +1.25. The left sph. is -6.50, cyl. -1.75, axis 1, and add +1.25.

    (I need to insert apology here, because I wasn't expecting to get into
    this. I just wanted to know about the script but y'all asked more
    questions so here's what I konw.) Aside from the high prescription,
    I've been having problems with a "haze" or what I can now describe as
    the view when your contact moves off of your eye. I see some blurred
    color and then after several minutes it clears back up. This is mainly
    in the left eye. I talked to the dr May 2006 about this and that when
    he put me in the progressives, performed all the tests that he could
    perform, issued an MRI and for me to see the neurologist, checking for
    a possibility of MS, along with other things. The neurologist said
    that the tests were negative for MS and mentioned a small possibility
    that it could be a migraine.

    I told the eye dr yesterday that I was still having these problems and
    that it felt like my left eye got worse since my script was written in
    July '07, even before getting my new glasses. He conducted a new
    visual test (which was normal) and dialated them for another look.
    Everything seemed fine but he wanted me to come back today for the
    refraction to be done again. I had to hand back my glasses because
    there was a tiny change in the right eye (not sure which part) but the
    astigmatism for the left eye went from -1.75 to -2.25. The dr said
    that they'd replace the glasses for me. He wants me to follow up with
    the neurologist again to make sure that everything's fine because he
    still feels that there could be an issue like MS.

    I don't know if this has any bearing or anything but I was in a car
    accident and had surgery on my neck (C-5/C-6 area) in 2005. Recovery
    went well. I was told that one issue with my vision and disconnected
    feeling could just be scare tissue/damage from the car accident. The
    disconnected feeling is that I feel like the right eye overpowers the
    left eye. Sometimes I'm reading and it's hard, like I'm seeing words
    and letters, I know they're words and letters, but I can't recognize
    what those letters and words are despite knowing how to read.
    Sometimes I reach for things and feel clumsy because I knock them over
    or I'll reach inside the potato bowl instead of picking up the potato
    bowl.

    I used to wear contacts but I ended up in gas perms due to my
    astigmatism. I was told that things have improved and I wanted to try
    new contacts but $333 for glasses vs. $450-500 for contacts. Money's
    REALLY tight since I'm looking for work so I chose the easy, less
    expensive remedy.

    I hope this helps y'all to understand. Thanks for the drs who have
    posted. I'll check again in a couple of days.

    Thanks,

    Lee

    On Sep 15, 10:26 pm, Lee <> wrote:
    > I am 33 years old with progressive lenses which, by some sites,
    > shouldn't happen until I'm in my 40's. I was put in progressives last
    > year when I was told that I have issues with accomodation and
    > presbyopia. This is in addition to my extreme nearsightedness and
    > astigmatism. I have had a drastic change in my prescription from last
    > year and it just had me wondering if there is a maximum strength for
    > eyeglass prescriptions? And if so, what is that amount?
    >
    > I don't have my prescription with me but I know that my eyes are -6.5
    > and -6.75 with about a +2.0 for the progressives. My astigmatism
    > numbers are like 007 and 133. I have to admit that the lower/stronger
    > the number gets, I wonder how much stronger the lenses will get before
    > the lenses are no longer correctable. I'm not afraid of this fact
    > because I realized as a young teen that both my parents had bad eyes
    > (both nearsighted) and that I may lose my sight at some point when I
    > get older. I just want to know how close I am to that happening if it
    > does.
    >
    > Thanks.
     
    Lee, Sep 18, 2007
    #14
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