Biomedics 55 C/L & astigmatism question?

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by Mark, Sep 16, 2003.

  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    At the moment I wear a -8.00 Focus N&D lens in my left eye only, the
    other had PRK. I don't sleep in the lens but out of the many soft lenses
    that I have tried the N&D appears to give me the best all round vision.
    I have a slight astigmatism (-0.75 axis180) and my optician says that
    the stiffer edge of the N&D helps to mask this better than other soft
    lenses. Although I'm only using the lens as a daily wear lens and not
    extended wear, it still becomes a little uncomfortable and feels dry
    towards the end of day which reduces the quality of vision.

    My optician has recently tried me with a Biomedics 55 lens and this lens
    appears to be a better fitting lens and remains comfortable all day.
    It's the same -8.00 power as the N&D lens and generally gives good
    distant vision throughout the day but at night time (or in levels of low
    light) the vision appears a little fuzzy, especially my near vision, as
    though the power of the lens is not quite strong enough. Could this be
    the astigmatism causing the patchy vision? Would slightly increasing
    the power of the lens help the astigmatism and maintain an overall
    balance of vision?
     
    Mark, Sep 16, 2003
    #1
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  2. Mark

    RM Guest

    Edge stiffness would not help mask astigmatism.

    I wonder what your age might be. If you are in your early forties, or
    nearing your forties, then the lens power might be OK (or actually need to
    be decreased). Presbyopia causes reduced near vision which is most
    noticable at low light levels. Likewise, if you are overcorrected for your
    nearsightedness (i.e. overminused), the same effect can occur even if your
    are much younger.
    Astigmatism can definitely cause patchy vision but based upon your chief
    complaint being reduced vision at near, presbyopia (or overcorrection) is
    also a possibility. Besides, in my experience, -0.75 cylinder is not very
    much and most patients don't even notice it if you don't correct it with a
    toric lens.

    Since there are several possibilities to investigate, you really need to
    discuss this with your eye doctor or optician to arrive at a final answer.

    RM O.D., Ph.D.
     
    RM, Sep 17, 2003
    #2
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