Clear lenses afford any UV protection?

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by me6, Aug 18, 2004.

  1. me6

    me6 Guest

    Question...

    Do my clear, non colored lenses of my bifocals afford
    ANY uv protection at all?

    Or must a lens have special coatings or chemicals to
    provide UV protection?

    How do colored lenses such as in sun glasses afford
    THEIR uv protection? Is it due to the dark coloring?
    Or to an additive to the lens material... or a coating?
     
    me6, Aug 18, 2004
    #1
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  2. Possibly.

    Most clear and cheap glass cuts off the most actinic part of the UV
    spectrum. Nonex, a Corning borosilicate glass used widely in the days of
    vacuum tubes and possibly neon tubes, was pretty good at that with a slight
    yellowish tinge.

    Bill
     
    Repeating Rifle, Aug 18, 2004
    #2
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  3. me6

    me6 Guest

    The transmittance curves show that
    Hmm.... I "think" my present lenses are poly carb....
    not sure. I know for sure they are NOT glass tho
    OK.... but nice to know that even the base materials
    afford "some" UV protection.

    Reason Im asking these questions is cause Im 46 yr old
    man..... needing new glasses. And Ive read abt the
    importance of wearing sunglasses all your life.
    Unfortunately I don't wear sunglasses but have always
    worn reg glasses since grade 6.

    So..... Im thinking abt a new set of bi-focals but with
    Transition lenses. Something that serves dual purpose
     
    me6, Aug 18, 2004
    #3
  4. me6

    Mark A Guest

    Yes, most lenses provide very good or 100% UV protection. For example, Sola
    Polycarbonate provides 100% protection of both UVA and UVB. Same should be
    true for the vast majority (if not all) of other polycarb lens
    manufacturers.

    Transition lens don't necessarily provide UV protection because the are
    Transitions. The base material is more important.
     
    Mark A, Aug 21, 2004
    #4
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