Computer glasses?

Discussion in 'Glasses' started by Jim T., May 5, 2005.

  1. It took me a long time to realize that the key to enjoying music, at least
    classical music, was the performance. One of my favorite recordings is a 10
    inch LP of tango music. Even with all the snaps, pops, and wows, it is the
    best record of that kind that I ever heard. I found it many years ago in an
    88¢ bin at a drug store.

    Since then, as my hearing has deteriorated, especially for high notes, I am
    glad to have leared that lesson.

    six-eyes Bill
     
    Repeating Rifle, May 7, 2005
    #21
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  2. Jim T.

    Dr. Leukoma Guest

    "six-eyes Bill"?

    How about "dollar Bill"?


    DrG
     
    Dr. Leukoma, May 7, 2005
    #22
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  3. When I was a kid, I could get candy for a penny. So...

    penny six-eye Bill
     
    Repeating Rifle, May 7, 2005
    #23
  4. Jim T.

    The Real Bev Guest

    I guess that I'm just lucky, then. No fatigue, no headache, and I really
    don't have a clue what eyestrain might be. My prescription glasses provide
    MUCH better vision than my contacts, but I figure after a couple of dozen
    trials this is the best I can get.
    With my 2.25 readers I can read 1/16" letters on my computer at distances
    between 7 inches and 24 inches, with sharpest vision at 15 inches. I choose
    to cram as much text on a screen as I can, the limiting factor being my chosen
    distance from the monitor. Clarity at further distances is much better with
    contacts+readers than with my newly-prescribed reading glasses. My contacts
    provide 20/40 vision in my right eye, much worse in my left.
    With all due respect, I'm not sure I can even get decent contacts. His first
    guess was Biomedics 55 torics, which move easily and stay stuck a bit too long
    before returning to position. These are 2-week lenses for the same price as
    the Cooper Frequency 55 torics, 1-month lenses. Bummer. I've been rotating
    the 3 pair of good Coopers for the last year, which is definitely rotten
    practice, but the doc looked at the oldest ones under the microscope and
    pronounced them clean, which surprised him.

    However, I just found out that Cooper owns Biomedics, and I think that
    whatever the normal quality of their products, their customer support is piss
    poor and I won't buy any of their products without an iron-clad replacement
    guarantee for individual lenses that are just wrong.
    I got prescription readers because I couldn't stand moving my head around to
    find the proper focus point with bifocals -- having an even smaller area to
    aim at doesn't seem feasible.
     
    The Real Bev, May 9, 2005
    #24
  5. Jim T.

    LarryDoc Guest

    Customizing near vision correction is an important part of my practice.
    Robert clearly knows that tweeking the optics for optimal range of
    vision for a given near point task is key to vision comfort. And he
    knows how to do that. Sadly, many doctors and opticians don't spend the
    time (eg: listen to patient's needs) to do the right thing.

    Some people using incorrect eyeglasses don't experience eye strain
    issues and yet strangely high levels of strain with the slightest
    optical imbalance. And there so many factors that can cause asthenopia
    (fancy word means: it don't feel good).

    I have patients measure their near point needs, and write it down. In
    office, I have them sit down in front of my computer, a textbook, a
    paperback book, a newspaper sprawled out on a desk, needlepoint
    ----whatever it is they need spectacles for. I calculate and then demo
    lenses that might work for them. Over contacts, bifocals, multifocal
    PALs. I then measure the ocular-motor effect of the lenses: do they make
    the eyes turn in or out, up or down---and then finalize an optical
    correction that will work, in a frame that is properly fit and adjusted
    for the correct viewing angle.

    Sounds complicated? It's not, nor is it very time consuming, especially
    considering the resultant eyeglasses will most surely be correct and the
    patient will be pleased and not needing further office time, other than
    to say "thanks!".

    --LB. O.D.
     
    LarryDoc, May 9, 2005
    #25
  6. Jim T.

    Jim T. Guest

    You may recall that I started this thread by looking for a temporary
    solution while waiting to be fitted with a permanent prescription
    after dual cataract surgery.
    Heres what I've done and consider the matter closed - at least for me.
    I have worn trifocals for many years and intend getting them when the
    time comes. I refuse to be constantly changing glasses. Besides, I
    look better with glasses on!
    I had some "drug store" reading glasses that are 2.25 and they work
    great now for reading. I found a pair of 1.50 power at Target for
    $7.99 and they are terrific for use at the computer. This was based on
    information that I got in this thread. Thanks.
    Good luck to those who wish to continue the debate.
     
    Jim T., May 9, 2005
    #26
  7. Just what is eye strain? Is it just a catch-all term? How is it measured?

    Bill
     
    Repeating Rifle, May 10, 2005
    #27
  8. Jim T.

    Dr. Leukoma Guest

    It is a symptom. The patient knows when they have it.

    DrG
     
    Dr. Leukoma, May 10, 2005
    #28
  9. If this post is in reply to my asking what eyestrain is, then the answer is
    a cop-out.

    Bill
     
    Repeating Rifle, May 11, 2005
    #29
  10. Jim T.

    otisbrown Guest

    Dear Bill,

    I am shocked, SHOCKED I say,
    that anyo OD would resort
    to a statement that you
    insist is a "cop-out."

    Best,

    Otis
     
    otisbrown, May 17, 2005
    #30
  11. Otis, do you know about net etiquette? I have no idea what you're
    talking about, since your post (quoted below, in its ENTIRETY) has no
    reference to any recent posts on this news group. If you're going to
    play the game, please read (and ABIDE BY) the rules...

    w.stacy, o.d.

    (p.s., and does "anyo OD" refer to "any old optometrist", or what?)
     
    William Stacy, May 17, 2005
    #31
  12. I think he was referring to a previous post of mine. I had asked for a
    definition of eye strain and how to measure it. Without mentioning names,
    the response was essentially you will know it if you have it.

    Bill
     
    Repeating Rifle, May 17, 2005
    #32
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