Computer Monitors.

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by edgardo j barbosa, Jul 9, 2006.

  1. Is it true that flat monitors are safer for the eyes than regular CRT
    monitors? I do not notice any difference and I have used both.

    Thanks
    Edgardo Barbosa
     
    edgardo j barbosa, Jul 9, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. edgardo j barbosa

    Ann Guest

    In what way safer?

    I'm going to get a glass fronted TFT monitor at work. Can't wait to
    see what it's like.

    Ann
     
    Ann, Jul 9, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Fragile?


    --
    Die dulci fruere,
    Nicolaas.



    .... Sometimes we need to laugh at ourselves so the people who are laughing
    at us don't feel too embarrassed.
     
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Jul 9, 2006
    #3
  4. edgardo j barbosa

    Charles Guest

    Ever tried to pick up a 21" CRT? You can hurt yourself.

    Seriously though, it seems that the lack of scan/flicker on a LCD might
    be beneficial in terms of eye strain. Plus, I've read that the lack of
    sharply defned edges on computer screen characters messes with the
    accomodation system a little. And this would be less of an effect with
    LCD too.
    --
     
    Charles, Jul 9, 2006
    #4
  5. edgardo j barbosa

    Quick Guest

    The OP may be referring to either CRT or LCD monitors.
    New CRTs are usually flat screened instead of a curved
    front surface. People also seem to refer to LCD monitors
    as flat screens (they are) as well.

    Scan/flicker is not discernable above about a 75hz scan rate.
    The way to tell if you can see it is to look away from the screen,
    keeping it in your peripheral vision and see if you can notice
    the flicker. CRTs scan constantly with the beam exciting the
    phosphors(sp?). LCDs only flip the crystals when the data
    changes.

    For fast motion, like in heavy duty gaming, CRTs (high end)
    are still superior. It takes a bit longer to flip the LCD crystals
    and can result in a perceptable "trail" effect.

    Sharpness of character edges is a function of the resolution
    and distance between pixels. A high res CRT will give sharper
    character edges than a lower res LCD (same size screen and
    characters).

    -Quick
     
    Quick, Jul 9, 2006
    #5
  6. edgardo j barbosa

    The Real Bev Guest

    Wuss! Just gotta use your legs instead of your back. Or so I would
    guess. Heaviest I've carried is 19".
    I've been using CRT monitors since 1978; since 1990 usage averages 8
    hours a day (just a guess). Current monitor is 1600x1200. I have no
    idea what eyestrain is.
     
    The Real Bev, Jul 9, 2006
    #6
  7. edgardo j barbosa

    Mark A Guest

    A 21" monitor with a Trinitron tube weighs about twice as much as a
    non-Trinitron 19".
     
    Mark A, Jul 9, 2006
    #7
  8. edgardo j barbosa

    Ann Guest

    I don't see why it would be any more fragile than a CRT. Just less of
    a footprint.

    Ann
     
    Ann, Jul 9, 2006
    #8
  9. The front of a CRT is a good 20mm or more thick. How thick is the glass
    front of a TFT monitor?

    --
    Die dulci fruere,
    Nicolaas.



    .... Our wishes lengthen as our sun declines.
     
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Jul 10, 2006
    #9
  10. Man, you have some kind of bullet proof CRT?
     
    William Stacy, Jul 10, 2006
    #10
  11. No, not at all, William. The face of a cathode ray tube is the heaviest
    and thickest part of its glass envelope. The CRT operates at high vacuum
    and there can be in excess of 30,000 volts floating around inside -
    resulting in the generation of x-rays. Hence, the front of a CRT is very
    thick lead glass both for strength (think what would happen if its
    integrity were breached - ever heard of an implosion? NOT pretty, except
    maybe pretty lethal) and for the protection (from radiation) of the
    viewer. That is why they are so bloody heavy.

    --
    Die dulci fruere,
    Nicolaas.



    .... A well informed man is one who shares your views
     
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Jul 10, 2006
    #11
  12. edgardo j barbosa

    Quick Guest

    Not usually lethal... When I was a kid we used to bust old
    TV tubes to hear them pop and implode.

    -Quick
     
    Quick, Jul 10, 2006
    #12
  13. edgardo j barbosa

    The Real Bev Guest

    No, not really. That's not an uncommon thickness.

    When my husband was a kid he tried to bash the front of a TV picture
    tube in with a shovel. He ultimately stood back and threw a rock at the
    neck, with entertaining and frightening results. As adults we tipped a
    picture tube into a BIG dumpster. A most satisfactory WHOOOOOMP! and a
    shower of crap shooting up into the air. Hey kids, don't try this at
    home...

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    =======================================================================
    "Lord, grant me the serenity to accept the things that I cannot change,
    the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to hide the
    bodies of the people who pissed me off."
     
    The Real Bev, Jul 10, 2006
    #13
  14. edgardo j barbosa

    Ann Guest

    I don't know but this one
    http://www.lowestonweb.com/Products/DisplayInfoMain.asp?e=B1E49780-9E14-4699-9FC1-069D189C548F
    is advertised as being ideal for the education, corporate and high use
    marketplace. Gotta love those phrases!

    Just wish they'd buy the bloody thing. Of course they have to source
    their own which will cost twice as much as that one and take several
    times as long to be delivered.

    Ann
     
    Ann, Jul 10, 2006
    #14
  15. I'd bet you broke them at the weakest point 0 the junction of the neck and
    the flare. That's comparitively tame. Try putting a hammer (you'll need
    a BIG one - like 4lb!) through the front face and see what happens. On
    second thoughts - don't! They aren't made thick, heavy and tough without
    good reason, Quick.

    --
    Die dulci fruere,
    Nicolaas.



    .... Why didn't Noah swat those two mosquitoes?
     
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Jul 10, 2006
    #15
  16. Until LCD screens reach at least 2048x1536 resolution, Ill stick with my NEC
    22" pure flat CRT. I bought mine a couple of years back prior having
    lasik, thinking worse case I could run 640x480 if lasik didn't go well.

    High end CRT's are still the choice of most professionals involved with high
    end CAD and imaging. Even hardcore gamers still prefer CRTs due to the
    smearing effect that a LCD typically exhibits. LCDs are getting better
    but can't equal the resolution or refresh rates provided by a CRT.

    Size and weight are the only major drawback of CRT technology.
     
    Rev Jessie James, Jul 11, 2006
    #16
  17. edgardo j barbosa

    Dick Adams Guest

    Furthermore, the price is right (free if you know where to look).

    (the dump, for instance)
     
    Dick Adams, Jul 11, 2006
    #17
  18. I agree, there are some great bargins on some fantastic CRT monitors out
    there. I picked my 22" CRT "off lease" at tiger direct for about $50, after
    rebate.

    I went in planning to buy an 19 or 20" lcd, but after seeing the picture
    quality of a high end CRT compaired side by side with the LCDs I couldn't
    pass it up.
     
    Rev Jessie James, Jul 12, 2006
    #18
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.