Contacts troubles with dry eyes

Discussion in 'Contact Lenses' started by Dave, Mar 14, 2007.

  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Hi Group,

    I'm 46 yrs old, just starting out with contacts. I've been wearing Acuvue
    Advanced for Astimatism, slowly building up the wear time. I was OK at up
    to 8 hours. I wore them for over 12 hours last Wednesday, then my eyes got
    very dry and sore. Almost a week later my eyes still feel dry and I can't
    put the lenses in for more than a few minutes. There is nothing visible, no
    redness or anything I can notice. When I look at my eyes up close they seem
    quite glossy, i.e. they don't appear dry.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks,

    Dave
     
    Dave, Mar 14, 2007
    #1
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  2. Dave

    Neil Brooks Guest

    I'm not a doctor, but ... if it were me ... I'd be making an
    appointment with the prescribing eye doc as soon as I could.

    Possible infection. Possible abrasion. Possible inflammation. Also,
    dry eyes don't have to /look/ dry to /be/ dry. Excess tearing, for
    example, is a classic symptom of dry eye.

    Don't wait. Good luck!

    Neil
     
    Neil Brooks, Mar 14, 2007
    #2
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  3. Dave

    callimico66 Guest

    I wore them for over 12 hours last Wednesday, then my eyes got
    Hi Dave-

    I think Neil is correct. You might have dry eyes. I wear contacts and
    have very dry eyes, and have experienced the exact same thing you're
    describing: when I wear certain contact lenses for too many hours, it
    seems I can never wear them again. I say "certain contacts" because my
    eyes will not tolerate many brands. I don't know the exact cause, but
    I believe the constant friction, dryness and rubbing on the cornea
    subtly damages the tissue. Springtime pollen can aggravate the
    problem, too--do you have allergies?

    I have noticed that if my eyes are really in good shape--dryness under
    control--then I can wear an incompatibile (new brand or type) of
    contact lens for a full day (8-10 hours). Then after that, I can never
    wear the lens again.

    Go to your eye doctor first, and if you do have dry eyes, you will
    probably have to try a different lens than Acuvue Advance. And give
    your eyes time to heal--stay out of contacts for a week or two before
    trying again.

    C66
     
    callimico66, Mar 14, 2007
    #3
  4. If you are using Renu or any of the generic solutions to store the
    lenses in, that would be the problem. Even if you are using the proper
    solution (like Optifree or Clear Care), you should be rubbing the lens
    to clean it after each use. Make sure you are also dumping out the
    solution and rinsing the case out after each insertion.
     
    William Stacy, Mar 14, 2007
    #4
  5. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for the replies (summarized below). I went back to the fitter and
    she had a cursory look and didn't see any problems. She suggested giving a
    few days without even trying to put the lenses in, which I will do. In
    general as the days go by my eyes are feeling better.

    C66 - what lenses do you find work best for your dry eyes? I've recently
    seen some testimonials that Proclear Compatables may be better for dry eyes.
    I may ask for a trial pair of those.

    I've got Clear Care now. Would you rub the lenses with another solution
    before treating them with C.C.?

    Thanks,

    Dave


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If the eyes are sore even without wearing contacts, you may have
    picked up a virus or have allergy. Get back to your fitter.


    Dr Judy



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    If you are using Renu or any of the generic solutions to store the
    lenses in, that would be the problem. Even if you are using the proper
    solution (like Optifree or Clear Care), you should be rubbing the lens
    to clean it after each use. Make sure you are also dumping out the
    solution and rinsing the case out after each insertion.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Hi Dave-

    I think Neil is correct. You might have dry eyes. I wear contacts and
    have very dry eyes, and have experienced the exact same thing you're
    describing: when I wear certain contact lenses for too many hours, it
    seems I can never wear them again. I say "certain contacts" because my
    eyes will not tolerate many brands. I don't know the exact cause, but
    I believe the constant friction, dryness and rubbing on the cornea
    subtly damages the tissue. Springtime pollen can aggravate the
    problem, too--do you have allergies?


    I have noticed that if my eyes are really in good shape--dryness under
    control--then I can wear an incompatibile (new brand or type) of
    contact lens for a full day (8-10 hours). Then after that, I can never
    wear the lens again.


    Go to your eye doctor first, and if you do have dry eyes, you will
    probably have to try a different lens than Acuvue Advance. And give
    your eyes time to heal--stay out of contacts for a week or two before
    trying again.


    C66

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I'm not a doctor, but ... if it were me ... I'd be making an
    appointment with the prescribing eye doc as soon as I could.


    Possible infection. Possible abrasion. Possible inflammation. Also,
    dry eyes don't have to /look/ dry to /be/ dry. Excess tearing, for
    example, is a classic symptom of dry eye.


    Don't wait. Good luck!


    Neil
     
    Dave, Mar 15, 2007
    #5
  6. Dave

    callimico66 Guest

    I wear an Extreme H2O in my left eye and a Biomedics XC in my right
    eye. Biomedics XC is similar to ProClear, but a little bit more
    "sturdy." I have found a lot of information on this forum; for
    example, I look up the threads/comments on particular brands of lenses
    (that's where I got the idea of trying Biomedics XC). At
    sci.med.vision, you can quickly learn the pros and cons from both the
    patients' and doctors' points of view. The other soft lenses I've
    heard of (and tried) for dry eyes are the ProClear, Acuvue Oasys,
    Focus Night & Day, and Purevision. These are comfortable lenses even
    if you don't have dry eye. I don't know which ones come with
    astigmatism correction--you'll have to ask your eye doctor.

    C66
     
    callimico66, Mar 15, 2007
    #6
  7. Dave

    Dr. Leukoma Guest

    Contact lens solutions are often a contributor to dry eye-like
    symptoms and irritation. Otherwise, I haven't run across a single
    study that points to contact lenses as a cause of permanent dry eye,
    and a number of studies have been done over the years. There is
    something known as a temporary contact lens-induced decrease in
    corneal sensitivity, which seems to be related to lack of oxygen and
    corneal metabolic changes. But, after a few days to a few months
    without wear, this apparently goes back to normal. Those of us in the
    eye care professions see practical implications of that all the time
    when a patient goes without their RGP lens for just a few days. They
    are much more aware of it when they resume wear.

    Neurotrophic keratitis is something altogether different, and
    permanent.

    DrG
     
    Dr. Leukoma, Mar 15, 2007
    #7
  8. Dave

    callimico66 Guest

    Thanks for clarifying that.

    The short-term problem I've experienced from over-wearing soft lenses
    is corneal edema/roughness--but as you say, this heals up if I stay
    out of contacts for a week or two. The long-term problem with contacts
    has happened since I've developed dry eyes---there are just some
    lenses that are incompatible with my eye condition.

    Most of the time, I feel the contacts actually protect my corneas--
    make them more comfortable. But I have my limits--I just have bad days
    sometimes and have to remove the lenses. One thing I've been doing
    lately is to leave them off at least one full day a week--usually
    Sunday--to give my eyes a rest.

    C66
     
    callimico66, Mar 16, 2007
    #8
  9. Dave

    Dr. Leukoma Guest

    Yes, and sometimes soft contact lenses are used as a bandage to
    protect extremely damaged epithelium....along with rewetting drops, of
    course.

    DrG
     
    Dr. Leukoma, Mar 16, 2007
    #9
  10. Dave

    Dan Abel Guest


    I'm not a doctor, but I have several ideas. Some contacts just don't
    work for some people. I tried one, and it just kept drying up and
    falling out.

    We went on a hike once. We got hopelessly lost. It was supposed to be
    a short hike, and we didn't have enough water. I got home and one
    contact was so dry that when I blinked, it just fell out. Be sure to
    drink enough. Coffee and alcohol don't count, they dehydrate.

    I used rewetting drops (simple saline). At work, the air was so dry
    that for certain times of the year, that wasn't enough. There are other
    drops that you can buy that work better. They are expensive, but worth
    it.
     
    Dan Abel, Mar 18, 2007
    #10
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