Corneoplasty Information I was sent from my Optomitrist

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by crippler, Aug 27, 2003.

  1. crippler

    crippler Guest

    Corneoplasty Now Uses Eye Drop
    Advanced Corneal Systems has developed the next best alternative to
    LASIK -- Corneaplasty, a non-surgical procedure that changes the shape
    of the cornea in a three-step process using modern ortho-k lenses as
    corneal molds, in conjunction with certain enzymes to prepare and
    final-set the cornea. First the cornea is prepared by applying a
    proprietary concentration of hyaluronidase, which absorbs into the
    cornea, making it softer and more malleable. Then the prepared cornea is
    molded into the desired shape with custom-fitted accelerated
    orthokeratology contact lenses, which the patient wears during the
    treatment period. Finally, a proprietary cross-linking agent "fixative"
    drop is administered to "set" the cornea in its optimum shape. Currently
    pharmaceutical giant Sandoz is helping Advanced Corneal Systems through
    FDA clinicals. Advanced Corneal Systems expects approval of its
    non-surgical, reversible procedure within one to two years.
     
    crippler, Aug 27, 2003
    #1
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  2. Very interesting. I believe this may be a bit dated. To my
    knowledge, ACS no longer exists and corneaplasty, although good in
    concept, has not proven itself to be predictable, reliable, and safe
    in its current form.

    Glenn Hagele
    Executive Director
    Council for Refractive Surgery Quality Assurance
    http://www.USAeyes.org
    http://www.ComplicatedEyes.org
    glenn dot hagele at usaeyes dot org

    I am not a doctor.
     
    Glenn Hagele - Council for Refractive Surgery Qual, Aug 27, 2003
    #2
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  3. crippler

    Dr. Leukoma Guest

    This is a "holy grail" of sorts, except that more clinical trials are
    needed. I think that this process is not moving forward at the moment, for
    whatever reason. Perhaps somebody can correct me.

    DrG
     
    Dr. Leukoma, Aug 28, 2003
    #3
  4. crippler

    crippler Guest

    it actually is new news

    My optomotrist said that to mold they shape of the eye they had to inject
    something. But now they only have to use eye drops to set the mold. Which
    the heading says.

    Corneoplasty is an old concept though, just the eye drops to set the mold
    rather than injection is the new part.
     
    crippler, Aug 28, 2003
    #4
  5. crippler

    LarryDoc Guest

    "Wouldn't it be nice?"

    "crippler's" news is old news. Advanced Corneal Systems, the name at
    least, hasn't been around for over three years. The "news report" he
    transcribed is therefore at least that old.

    The info I have, which is three weeks old, is that Corneaplasty USA
    phase II trials were not completed, or at least the results not compiled
    and submitted to the FDA and phase III trials didn't get off the
    ground---at least not yet, mostly due to financial issues with the
    company. Ista Pharmaceutical's Vitrase, another hyaluronidase product,
    is nearing approval and just months from marketting. Some docs I know
    don't think this is going to be a highly useful treatment. A good
    treatment, but not good enough and useful enough to get excited about.
    But there are other uses from this product, corneaplasty being one.

    So it is by no means a dead product, though. If the "unofficial" results
    seen in outside the USA trials are real, Corneaplasty will someday,
    perhaps sooner than we think, be here. If everything goes perfectly,
    that would make availabilty in about two years, at least in the USA. And
    if it does come to market, it's pretty much by-by LASIK, if for no other
    reason than the market for myopes under 6 diopters (approx) will
    disappear like pooooff! The "drug" is also being developed as a
    treatment for keratconus and cornea scars.

    You might think that a treatment with so much public benefit and
    industry profitability would be fast-tracked for approval with hordes of
    investors propelling it. But that is not happenning and I don't have
    any idea why.

    I tend to be suspicious of stuff like this---------


    --Larry

    (Information presented is based on what I know, or at least have good
    reason to believe as factual, plus my opinion as indicated. I have no
    personal financial interest, as of this writing, in any company, product
    or process mentioned.)

    --
    Dr. Larry Bickford, O.D.
    Family Practice Eye Health & Vision Care

    The Eyecare Connection
    http//www.eyecarecontacts.com
    larrydoc at m a c.c o m
     
    LarryDoc, Aug 28, 2003
    #5
  6. crippler

    LarryDoc Guest

    "Wouldn't it be nice?"

    "crippler's" news is old news. Advanced Corneal Systems, the name at
    least, hasn't been around for over three years. The "news report" he
    transcribed is therefore at least that old.

    The info I have, which is three weeks old, is that Corneaplasty USA
    phase II trials were not completed, or at least the results not compiled
    and submitted to the FDA and phase III trials didn't get off the
    ground---at least not yet, mostly due to financial issues with the
    company. Ista Pharmaceutical's Vitrase, another hyaluronidase product,
    is nearing approval and just months from marketting. Some docs I know
    don't think this is going to be a highly useful treatment. A good
    treatment, but not good enough and useful enough to get excited about.
    But there are other uses from this product, corneaplasty being one.

    So it is by no means a dead product, though. If the "unofficial" results
    seen in outside the USA trials are real, Corneaplasty will someday,
    perhaps sooner than we think, be here. If everything goes perfectly,
    that would make availabilty in about two years, at least in the USA. And
    if it does come to market, it's pretty much by-by LASIK, if for no other
    reason than the market for myopes under 6 diopters (approx) will
    disappear like pooooff! The "drug" is also being developed as a
    treatment for keratconus and cornea scars.

    You might think that a treatment with so much public benefit and
    industry profitability would be fast-tracked for approval with hordes of
    investors propelling it. But that is not happenning and I don't have
    any knowlege why.

    Perhaps it either doesn't work well enough, consistent enough, or
    there's a health issue.

    --Larry

    (Information presented is based on what I know, or at least have good
    reason to believe as factual, plus my opinion as indicated. I have no
    personal financial interest, as of this writing, in any company, product
    or process mentioned.)

    --
    Dr. Larry Bickford, O.D.
    Family Practice Eye Health & Vision Care

    The Eyecare Connection
    http//www.eyecarecontacts.com
    larrydoc at m a c.c o m
     
    LarryDoc, Aug 28, 2003
    #6
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