difficulty reading the menu

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by shaunna_yokem, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. HI,

    I waitress two nights a week, and have a real hard time seeing the menu
    when a customer points at a partcular item he wants to order. I wear
    strong bifocals and can see ok at a distance and if things are close
    enough to read normally, but my manager has noticed how hard a time I
    have waitressing. Can anyone give me some help in getting glasses I can
    see better with? This is a real problem!!

    Shaunna

    ___________________________________________
    Meet me at Yahoo! http://profiles.yahoo.com/shaunna_yokem
     
    shaunna_yokem, Dec 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. by the pic at your page it looks like you are VERY hyperopic with
    bifocals. are you aphakic? (did you have cataract surgery as a baby?)
    anyway, unless you have some organic reason you can't be corrected to
    "normal" vision (in the 20/20 range), getting a good refraction should
    do the trick. You might also want to try contacts. Make sure you have
    medical insurance, because you might just qualify for some refractive
    surgery (clear lens exchange and/or iol implant) in the future.

    w.stacy, o.d.
     
    William Stacy, O.D., Dec 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. Ys, I did have cataracts as a baby and have had glasses ever since. I
    can see ok, not quite 20/20, but pretty good, and have no problems
    reading anything but really fine print, like the phone book!! But the
    probelm is that in this situation things are too far away for my near
    lenses at the bottom of my glasses, but too close for my distance part
    of my glasses. Actually, this has always been a prblem, but as a
    waitress it is really crippling. What can I do about it??

    Shaunna

    ___________________________________________
    Meet me at Yahoo! http://profiles.yahoo.com/shaunna_yokem
     
    shaunna_yokem, Dec 11, 2006
    #3
  4. ok then you should be able to get a decent result.

    1. get a careful refraction, and ask for an "add" power that gets you
    20/20 at about 17 inches. this can be in

    a. a regular bifocal that will give you good far and near vision, but
    you might have a problem between 20 inches and 60 inches out.

    b. a trifocal, that will give you good vision at all distances, but will
    have 2 lines per lens, instead of 1.

    c. a progressive, that will give you good vision at all distances,
    without lines, but you will have small areas of intermediate and near
    vision.

    d. contacts plus glasses (my favorite choice, if you can wear CLs).
    they will give you great distance vision, and you will only nead a weak
    pair of glasses for the other distances (which can be single vision
    readers, bifocal, trifocal or progressive "over-wear" glasses.

    e. get iols. careful here, and drop me a line about this if you decide
    to do it. they will be like contacts, except you don't have to put them
    in an out every day, week, month, whatever. You'll still need the d.
    solutions for reading, unless you opt for mono. which reminds me, do
    BOTH eyes correct to near 20/20 and do you have normal binocularity?
    the answer tho those ?s will help me in recommending a solution.

    w.stacy, o.d.
     
    William Stacy, O.D., Dec 11, 2006
    #4
  5. shaunna_yokem

    crvc56 Guest

    I can't often read the menu in restaurants because of low lighting. I
    keep a small keychain light for that reason. It's the size of a nickel
    and sheds a lot of light.
     
    crvc56, Dec 11, 2006
    #5
  6. I asked my eye doc about trifocals and they cannot be made in my
    prescription--it's too strong. Contacts have never worked for me, so
    maybe IOLs are the way. I don't have 20/20 inboth eyes, or even in one
    eye. I am about 20/40 in my good eye, and 20/200 in my bad eye.

    Shaunna

    ___________________________________________
    Meet me at Yahoo! http://profiles.yahoo.com/shaunna_yokem
     
    shaunna_yokem, Dec 15, 2006
    #6
  7. I'd really be surprised if you couldn't get them in your power. Maybe
    his lab doesn't do them. Anyway, I think there's hope for you in the new
    lens implants that leave your existing crystalline lens in place.
    It's pretty new, and you'd want to go to the absolute best since you
    only have one good eye. And in the meantime, your doc can at least make
    a stronger bifocal, if not a trifocal, that will enable you to read a menu.

    w.stacy, o.d.
     
    William Stacy, O.D., Dec 16, 2006
    #7
  8. Thanks. I thought that was probably true. Another example of a
    practitioner denying something is made, perhaps out of ignorance,
    perhaps something more sinister. Very bad.
    Actually, that was a mistake on my part. I had forgotten that she was
    aphakic. She would be a candidate for a pseudophakic iol, but she would
    need very specialized surgery because I'm pretty sure the capsule and
    all are gone.

    w.stacy, o.d.
     
    William Stacy, O.D., Dec 19, 2006
    #8
  9. My prescripition is in the +16 range, which makes getting any decent
    pair of glasses made. Mostly they optician tried to peddle the
    lenticular design-you know, those bubble lenses--which focus fine but
    leave almost no peripheral vision. In the past year or so I have found
    a place that can make the lenses 'full field', but never have I found
    anyone who can make these in a trifocal design. I would be delighted to
    do so!!

    You are correct. There are really no anchoring structures for the IOL.

    Love,

    Shaunna
     
    shaunna_yokem, Dec 20, 2006
    #9
  10. allrighty then, I retract my comment about your doc. I checked with my
    lab and it does look like trifocals are not available in your powers.
    Your best bet remains IOL implants. Tricky on eyes like yours, so if
    you decided to do it, make sure you find the best surgeon in your area,
    or out of it if you don't mind traveling. Another choice would be
    contacts. I assume you've tried them, but even if you have, a contact
    that corrects the main error would allow you to get ordinary power
    bifocals for wearing over them. The third best option is to just get a
    stronger bifocal made, and know that your intermediate range vision (say
    20 to 30 inches out) will not be so good (you will have to move closer
    or farther away to see clearly).

    Good luck.

    w.stacy, o.d.
     
    William Stacy, Dec 20, 2006
    #10
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