Driving restrictions for persons affected by Amblyopia

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by sanju, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. sanju

    sanju Guest

    Can a person with Amblyopia drive car in USA?
     
    sanju, Mar 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. sanju

    CatmanX Guest

    Yes. You only neeed one eye to pass a driving test. There may be
    restrictions on the other eye, but assuming your good eye sees 20/20,
    you will have no problems.

    dr grant
     
    CatmanX, Mar 15, 2006
    #2
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  3. sanju

    Dan Abel Guest

    The US is very much into the concept of "state rights". Each state sets
    their own laws, including those about driving vehicles. My wife is
    blind in one eye due to amblyopia, and has a driving license, although
    she had to take a special driving test to get it.
     
    Dan Abel, Mar 15, 2006
    #3
  4. sanju

    sanju Guest

    Thanks a lot Dr. Grant for the prompt reply. Recently I visited DOL in
    Bellevue WA and they told that an Amblyopic needs a fitness letter from
    eye specialist for the lazy eye. Is it true?
     
    sanju, Mar 15, 2006
    #4
  5. sanju

    CatmanX Guest

    LOL, you don't have to get your photo taken until 10 years here and
    then they have private providers to take the photos, who don't care if
    you have a guide dog or not.

    dr grant
     
    CatmanX, Mar 16, 2006
    #5
  6. sanju

    Quick Guest

    heh, that might get you on the tonight show. Valid
    driver's license with picture of you wearing shades
    with cane and guide dog.

    "Speeding and red light, officer? The damned dog did it!"

    -Quick
     
    Quick, Mar 16, 2006
    #6
  7. sanju

    sanju Guest

    Did your wife have to pay more insurance per month because she is
    amblyopic?
     
    sanju, Mar 18, 2006
    #7
  8. sanju

    Mark A Guest

    Persons with amblyopia do not pay more auto insurance in the US.
     
    Mark A, Mar 18, 2006
    #8
  9. sanju

    Dan Abel Guest

    No. Of course, they didn't ask and she didn't volunteer the information.
     
    Dan Abel, Mar 19, 2006
    #9
  10. sanju

    Mark A Guest

    A person with amblyopia does not have one eye. The lazy eye still provides
    the equivalent of peripheral vision in most cases. I don't think those stats
    you cited were compiled with people who have amblyopia.
     
    Mark A, Mar 19, 2006
    #10
  11. sanju

    Ann Guest

    Probably not, but it's still a visual impairment that ought to be
    declared. It's not only about peripheral vision. I don't know what
    insurers are like over there, but here they will do anything to get
    out of paying out on a claim and non declaration of a visual
    impairment is playing right into their hands.

    Ann
     
    Ann, Mar 20, 2006
    #11
  12. sanju

    Mark A Guest

    I have been insured by the same company for 28 years and they have never
    asked me, and I don't think it needs to be declared. My driving record
    during that time has been way above average with only 1 minor accident.

    About 20 years ago the state (who issued drivers licenses) tested both eyes
    during the eye exam, but that is no longer the case.
     
    Mark A, Mar 21, 2006
    #12
  13. sanju

    Dan Abel Guest

    [/QUOTE]
    It's no secret. Both my wife and I don't use our right eyes. We both
    have forms signed by our OD's on file with the State of California
    Department of Motor Vehicles stating that, and that it isn't
    correctable. We both subsequently took driving tests with a DMV
    examiner to prove that we could drive with just one eye.

    We have valid driver's licenses, with the complete understanding that we
    see out of one eye only.
     
    Dan Abel, Mar 21, 2006
    #13
  14. sanju

    Ann Guest

    It's no secret. Both my wife and I don't use our right eyes. We both
    have forms signed by our OD's on file with the State of California
    Department of Motor Vehicles stating that, and that it isn't
    correctable. We both subsequently took driving tests with a DMV
    examiner to prove that we could drive with just one eye.

    We have valid driver's licenses, with the complete understanding that we
    see out of one eye only.[/QUOTE]

    We're not talking about driving licences we're talking about
    insurance. And I have no idea what happens in the states but I do
    know what happens here. Not being asked about a certain disorder is
    no defence here. Non disclosure is non disclosure.

    Ann
     
    Ann, Mar 22, 2006
    #14
  15. sanju

    Mark A Guest

    I think that it has been made very clear that it does not work that way in
    the USA.

    Even in cases where an insurance company in the USA does charge more for
    amblyopia (which I am not aware of), the insurance company can only demand
    retroactive payment of the additional premiums (probably only for the last
    insurable period), they cannot deny a claim (unless they can prove fraud).
    But I am not sure if they can even demand retroactive premiums if they don't
    at least ask about these issues in the application for insurance.

    Since driving records are publicly available in the US, insurance companies
    depend more on your accident and traffic ticket rate than on medical issues
    (in most cases). They also do the underwriting based on other factors such
    as miles driven weekly, the exact model and year of the car, age of driver,
    martial status (in some cases for men under 25), location, years insured
    with current company, and some other factors.

    Are drivers in the UK insured by the government? That may explain the
    non-disclosure issue. In the USA, insurance is a private business and it is
    up to the insurance company to ask consumers about the underwriting factors
    that they need to determine your premiums.

    The other thing that you wrong about (in previous posts you have made) is
    comparing accident rates of people with only one eye with accident rates for
    people with amblyopia. That is an incorrect use of statistics since the
    conditions are not the same.
     
    Mark A, Mar 23, 2006
    #15
  16. sanju

    Ann Guest

    ROFL.. No. Not everything in the UK is government run.

    Ann
     
    Ann, Apr 1, 2006
    #16
  17. sanju

    A Lieberman Guest

    What's the impairment???? There is none in my case

    I am nearsighted with 3 diopter difference between eyes, amblyopic (right
    eye is my dominant eye)

    I drive, fly a plane just as good as a person without amblyopia

    Allen
     
    A Lieberman, Apr 1, 2006
    #17
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