Eye charts for illiterate patients

Discussion in 'Eye-Care' started by gmburns, Sep 1, 2006.

  1. gmburns

    gmburns Guest

    Hi everyone,

    I'm a translator in Paraguay, and I'm translating a text that would
    literally read:

    "[illiterate] patients were tested using the divergent lines/rays chart
    to measure cylindrical refractive error."

    The famous "tumbling E chart" is referred to elsewhere. Does someone
    know the official name in English of the "divergent lines/rays chart".

    Thanks in advance for any help.


    Michael Burns
     
    gmburns, Sep 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. gmburns

    S Akky Guest

    put fingers to keyboard and typed...
    Fan and Block chart?
     
    S Akky, Sep 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. gmburns

    Jan Guest

    schreef:
    Clock dial chart? (in Dutch "stralenkrans")

    Jan (normally Dutch spoken)
     
    Jan, Sep 1, 2006
    #3
  4. gmburns

    otisbrown Guest

    Dear Michael,

    It is not clear exactly what are looking for. The following
    site has "Tumbling Es" for your interest.

    http://www.i-see.org/eyecharts.html

    Otis

    +++++++++++++
     
    otisbrown, Sep 1, 2006
    #4
  5. gmburns

    otisbrown Guest

    I believe that an astigmatic chart was
    included in the i-see chart section.

    Otis
     
    otisbrown, Sep 2, 2006
    #5
  6. gmburns

    CatmanX Guest

    Hi Michael,

    It refers to a fan chart. There are 2 components: first the fan, which
    tells us the axis of astigmatism, second a right angle, like an L that
    allows us to evaluate the degree of astigmatism. It is not used much in
    clinical prattise as it is slow and not super-accurate. More of
    historical benefit.

    Cheers,

    dr grant
     
    CatmanX, Sep 2, 2006
    #6
  7. gmburns

    LarryDoc Guest

    I use it once or twice a month when retinoscopy/autorefract is
    inconsistent with subjective. Usually due to wearing spectacles that
    are so completely off power and axis.

    Also use it more often to demonstrate the effect of astigmatism.

    And it's a cool visual!

    LB, O.D.
     
    LarryDoc, Sep 2, 2006
    #7
  8. gmburns

    Jan Guest

    CatmanX schreef:
    Is it not the clockdial, the chart with spokes (like an antic wheel) and
    in the middle of it an pointing arrow (two legs angle about 30
    degrees) used with the "fog" method ?

    Maybe a little old fashioned method but still very accurate and very
    easy to explain to people.

    In advance "shut up Ace"

    And concerning Otis,

    Free to Marcus Porcius Cato's "Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam"

    In conclusion, I think that the "old plus lens junk therapy recovered by
    Otis" should be destroyed.


    Jan (normally Dutch spoken)
     
    Jan, Sep 2, 2006
    #8
  9. gmburns

    Jan Guest

    schreef:
    Off cause Otis, that it isn't completely clear to you is very clear to
    every real eye care specialist here.

    Please be so kind and beat a retread Otis.

    Free to Marcus Porcius Cato's "Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam"

    In conclusion, I think that the "old plus lens junk therapy recovered by
    Otis" should be destroyed.


    Jan (normally Dutch spoken)
     
    Jan, Sep 2, 2006
    #9
  10. gmburns

    Jan Guest

    CatmanX schreef:
    Is it not the clockdial, the chart with spikes (like an antic wheel) and
    in the middle of it an pointing arrow (two legs angle about 30
    degrees) used with the "fog" method ?

    Maybe a little old fashioned method but still very accurate and very
    easy to explain to people.

    In advance "shut up Ace"

    And concerning Otis,

    Free to Marcus Porcius Cato's "Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam"

    In conclusion, I think that the "old plus lens junk therapy recovered by
    Otis" should be destroyed.


    Jan (normally Dutch spoken)
     
    Jan, Sep 2, 2006
    #10
  11. gmburns

    gmburns Guest

    My sincere thanks to all who have helped. Looking around, I seem to
    find that the "clock dial" and "fan" charts are either extremely
    similar or else identical, and either fits my source's mention of
    'diagonal lines'.

    The translation is from work done with an indigenous people in a remote
    location in Latin America that the medical personnel had trouble even
    getting to, so it is likely they used a less than optimal tests due to
    transportability.

    Thanks again. You have not only helped me, but also the people whose
    eyes were being tested.


    Michael Burns
     
    gmburns, Sep 4, 2006
    #11
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