eyeglass frames

Discussion in 'Glasses' started by Myrna, Aug 2, 2005.

  1. Myrna

    Myrna Guest

    OK, here I am again. I am having too much trouble with all the
    choices/decisions involved with selecting a new frame. I've never been
    one to care much for designer labels. Nowadays everything is designer,
    including frames. So my question is: are these frames really better
    quality than a frame that is not designer? Has anyone heard of Marchon?
    I was admiring one of these. It has a price tag of $158. Most of the
    frames are in the $250+ category. Salesperson said the Gucci, etc.,
    hold up better, have a longer warranty and cost more because the
    designers make a quality product that they are willing to put their
    names on. What do you all think? I've been wearing a non-designer,
    aluminum frame and always liked it. I never even asked about a warranty
    when I bought it. But it's time for something new.

    Myrna
     
    Myrna, Aug 2, 2005
    #1
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  2. Myrna

    Mark A Guest

    Marchon is major frame manufacturer that sells frames under their own brand
    name and also designer brand names. Marchon frames have a wide range of
    prices, but are generally in the mid to high price range.
    http://www.marchon.com

    There is no relationship between designer frames and quality. They don't
    have better warranties, they don't hold up better, and the name of the
    person probably has never seen the frame.

    A particular designer frame might be better quality and have a better
    warranty than some other particular non-designer frame, but that is just a
    coincidence. Part of price of every designer frame goes to the designer for
    using the name, without any added improvement in quality. But if you like a
    particular designer frame and it fits well, then it might be worth the extra
    price over the a similar quality non-designer frame.
     
    Mark A, Aug 2, 2005
    #2
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  3. FWIW, I've been pretty happy with Safilo frames my last few go-arounds.
     
    Scott Seidman, Aug 2, 2005
    #3
  4. Myrna

    timbirr Guest

    Went through the whole mess when I went for new glasses a couple of
    weeks ago.

    Designer frames that seemed of any "quality" started at $170 and
    quickly went up to $300 or more.

    Cheaper frames were maybe $140-$200, but they were often "cheap."

    By comparison shopping, and finding a good optician I was able to pick
    up a nice frame for $100. Seek a good shop and get some good advice. It
    took me some three hours to do this, but was happy with the results.
     
    timbirr, Aug 2, 2005
    #4
  5. I sell a good quantity of marchon frames and rarely have a problem.
     
    firebrandfaerie, Aug 3, 2005
    #5
  6. Myrna

    The Real Bev Guest

    When I get new glasses I look through the very cheapest plastic (I hate the
    metal-frame nosepieces) frames until I find some that don't hurt. Then I look
    in the mirror to see which is least annoying. Most recent single-vision
    plastic spectacles were $50 (maybe $60, my receipt just shows the total for
    the exam and two pair of glasses: $244.80 for frames and lenses, 1 pr single
    vision, 1 pr bifocals).

    The only one of these frames I've ever broken was when I face-planted while
    skiing. I repaired it with super glue and it lasted until I needed new
    glasses again. I get new glasses perhaps every five years.

    While I was waiting for a copy of my prescription at Sears a woman came in
    bemoaning the fact that she had just broken her brand-new $250 frames which
    were apparently only about a week old. The guy was very sorry, but she really
    should have opted for the breakage insurance...

    Frames is frames.

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    "I've seen a look in dogs' eyes, a quickly vanishing look
    of amazed contempt, and I am convinced that basically dogs
    think humans are nuts." -- John Steinbeck
     
    The Real Bev, Aug 4, 2005
    #6
  7. Myrna

    cbf Guest

    If the nosepeaces hurt your nose, ask the store if they have soft
    silicone nosepieces.

    Cheers CBF
    (from Hans Christian Andersens home Country Denmark)
     
    cbf, Aug 5, 2005
    #7
  8. Myrna

    The Real Bev Guest

    They were good enough to swap the nosepieces at least half a dozen times.
    Turns out that even if they don't hurt they cut off my nasal passages, which
    are maybe a millimeter across :-(


    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    ===================================================
    "I love deadlines... especially the whooshing sound
    they make as they go by." -Douglas Adams
     
    The Real Bev, Aug 6, 2005
    #8
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