Glasses for 5 year-old twins?

Discussion in 'Glasses' started by Pat Coghlan, Aug 23, 2006.

  1. Pat Coghlan

    Simon Dean Guest

    Problem is, a normal person, might take this lump of shit seriously!
    When people start using long complicated words with "authority", they
    can only somehow think they're qualified and listen to them!

    I was half taken by "Ace"s post at first, then I realised, I can read
    without glasses, I have no blur, and my accomodation is just fine!
     
    Simon Dean, Aug 27, 2006
    #41
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  2. Pat Coghlan

    Simon Dean Guest

    A wise choice, and good luck. Remember too, just because people post
    here with a degree of certainty, doesn't make them right. Sometimes
    they're just kooks who havent met you or your children!
     
    Simon Dean, Aug 27, 2006
    #42
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  3. Pat Coghlan

    Ace Guest


    Ok questions:

    Can you see 20/20 without correction, if not, how close?
    How blurry are things from near(16 inches) without your reading
    glasses?
    Why are you wearing glasses?
     
    Ace, Aug 27, 2006
    #43
  4. Pat Coghlan

    Simon Dean Guest

    So you have to ask questions? Why did you give me your considered
    opinion before asking?

    Yes, I can read 20/20 without correction. In fact, better.

    At sixteen inches, things are clear, but not necessarily sharp.
    Fractionally, marginally things are a little, shall we say,
    "anti-aliased" lightly around the edges.

    Why am I wearing glasses?

    Im not.

    In May 2005, I went for my annual eye test, and was told that things are
    fractionally worse than they were the year before at +.75 in one eye,
    and that glasses weren't recommended but I could get them if I wanted.

    I had a pair made up to see if they would help with eye strain.

    They did. They also made things a lot sharper than I could possibly have
    expected. But that could also be due to the astigmatism rather than the
    hyperopia.

    I put them on now, and things still remain sharp. But I don't wear them
    all the time. I still suffer from eye strain, but things are manageable.

    Cya
    Simon
     
    Simon Dean, Aug 27, 2006
    #44
  5. Pat Coghlan

    Ace Guest

    Then its the headaches that force you to wear glasses even though your
    distance is 20/20 and your near vision is only a little blurred due to
    hyperopia and astigmatism.
    In your case, your wearing glasses not for good vision, but the big
    difference in not having to strain to accomodate your hyperopia. I have
    simulated +.75 and even though my vision was still clear, it was a
    strain and my eyes and head begin to hurt! So I can see your reason for
    part time glasses wear, especially for near. Being myopic, I dont have
    the headache problem and I see perfect from near.
     
    Ace, Aug 27, 2006
    #45
  6. Pat Coghlan

    Simon Dean Guest

    Who said anything about headaches?

    I didn't.

    Again, you're just making stuff up.
    Unless you've read differently, not only do help with eye strain at
    times of need, but THEY ALSO GIVE ME BETTER VISION AND MAKE EVERYTHING
    SHARPER.

    Of course, in case you've forgotten, again, I also have a slight
    astigmatism. So the glasses also solve that little hurdle as well.
    Eh? So beause that's how it is with you, that's how it must be with
    everyone? Don't really care how it makes you feel, Im the patient.

    Explain this +.75 simulation? Monkeying around with your lenses again or
    something?
    Except you don't, because, as I've already said, although I've had them
    made up, I don't wear them, despite the obvious benefits.

    The reason why I don't wear them, is because I have acceptable vision,
    that I personally feel that I don't need to wear them.
    Problem solved then.
     
    Simon Dean, Aug 27, 2006
    #46
  7. Pat Coghlan

    Ace Guest

    You have confused me. Let me try to understand it, you were told you
    had 20/20 vision without glasses, yet got prescribed glasses so the
    optometrist/optican can make profit even though you dont need glasses
    and the very slight difference wasnt worth you bothering with the
    hassles of glasses. You see without glasses better than most people see
    with glasses!


    So you have absolutely NO problems without glasses except the tiniest
    bit of blur from near due to hyperopia and astigmatism
     
    Ace, Aug 27, 2006
    #47
  8. Pat Coghlan

    Simon Dean Guest

    Yes (and if you read to the bottom I'll explain. again).
    Incorrect given the above.

    Let me explain again.

    Yearly, I go to the optician for a checkup. Im a computer user. I get
    told what my values are time after time. Sometimes its plano, sometimes
    it's just a slight hyperopia and slight astigmatism (-.50).

    Last time, I was checked to be +.75 hyperopia and -0.50 astigmatism.

    My optician said that the values were higher, and I'll probably need to
    think about getting glasses at some stage, but he said "you don't need
    glasses now, unless you feel you have a problem".

    I didn't feel that I had a problem.

    But I did have a degree of eye strain that was getting me down at the time.

    I went to the optician and had them make up a cheap pair of glasses for
    me to see how things worked.

    So I found that the glasses actually relieved my eye strain at the time.
    But on top of that, the glasses actually made things clearer and sharper
    to see. I didn't expect that.

    It's been a year since I had the glasses made, and six months since I
    was told that I had returned to plano. Given my thyroid condition that
    seems to affect my vision each time I need an increase in my meds, and
    the fact Im plano, I don't wear the glasses so much anymore. I just wear
    them as required, such as if my eye strain gets me down or Im having
    trouble reading things.

    Yes, even now, the glasses would still work. I can look at the text Im
    writing now without glasses, and it looks ok here at the moment, it's
    fine. But the glasses will just make it a little sharper, as well as
    helping with any eye strain.

    Do they help? Yes.
    Do they help even now? Yes.
    Do I need to wear them? No.
    Why did I get them? At the time I had a lot of eye strain.
    Do I wear them now? As required.

    Does that explain it all?

    Honestly Ace, you have to learn to read and stop making assumptions,
    such as "Oh, you have headaches" when I never said a word!

    Cya
    Simon
     
    Simon Dean, Aug 27, 2006
    #48
  9. Pat Coghlan

    otisbrown Guest

    Dear Ace,

    It is true that some people LOVE glasses.

    That is fine -- so give them the glasses they love.

    We often do not get what we want -- we get
    what we deserve.

    Think about it.

    Otis
     
    otisbrown, Aug 27, 2006
    #49
  10. Pat Coghlan

    Jan Guest

    schreef:
    That's correct Otis and some people SHOULD love glasses, you for instance.

    Simon explained clip and clear why he OCCASIONALLY wear glasses.
    Fully agreed.

    Free to Marcus Porcius Cato's "Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam"

    In conclusion, I think that the "old plus lens junk recovered by Otis"
    should be destroyed.

    Jan (normally Dutch spoken)
     
    Jan, Aug 27, 2006
    #50
  11. Pat Coghlan

    Simon Dean Guest

    I've thought about it, and conclude you a selfish arrogant dangerous
    cold hearted ignorant manipulative and evil.

    To talk like this suggesting people who wear glasses get all that they
    deserve.

    "We get what we deserve", good, I hope you get yours too.
     
    Simon Dean, Aug 27, 2006
    #51
  12. Pat Coghlan

    CatmanX Guest

    Dangling from the end of a rope comes to mind.
     
    CatmanX, Aug 29, 2006
    #52
  13. Pat Coghlan

    Neil Brooks Guest

    He did.

    Google around and you can find a picture of his wife, Carol. Bela
    Lugosi comes to mind....

    http://www.svcn.com/archives/wgresident/08.16.00/gifs/remember-when-0033.jpg
     
    Neil Brooks, Aug 30, 2006
    #53
  14. Pat Coghlan

    Dr. Leukoma Guest

    Amblyopia, or lazy eye, is more prevalent in farsighted children in the
    eye that is more farsighted. I have seen amblyopia develop in children
    with a difference of 1.00 diopter between the two eyes. Lazy eye also
    has a strong genetic basis.

    Also, unless a cylcoplegic refraction has been performed (i.e. dilating
    drops), it is quite possible that the 1.75 diopters of farsightedness
    is an underestimation.

    Obviously, if a child has a lazy eye, they will compensate by using the
    good eye. The key points are to (1) obtain an accurate assessment of
    monocular visual acuity, and (2) an accurate refraction, i.e. with
    cycloplegia. This will help you decide if doing nothing is causing
    more harm than doing something.

    DrG
     
    Dr. Leukoma, Aug 30, 2006
    #54
  15. Pat Coghlan

    Simon Dean Guest

    Simon Dean, Aug 30, 2006
    #55
  16. Pat Coghlan

    Ace Guest

    Simon Dean said:

    Ok, have you asked your doctor why your prescription isnt stable? Mine
    has been stable for years save for the gradual improvement in the last
    18 months, but thats due to addressing the pseudomyopia component.


    So you are a latent hyperope and starting to become presbyopic and its
    showing in the manifest refraction. Whats your cycloplegic refraction?
    That could be the reason you had eyestrain, especially for close work
    like computer.


    latent hyperope, see above.


    Thats normal. I also see clearer from near if I take my glasses off or
    put on reading glasses over my full power glasses.

    In what way is your thyroid condition affecting vision? Id get a
    cycloplegic refraction and find out once for all how hyperopic you are.


    Thats hyperopia for ya! Youll need readers, especially as you get
    older. I take my glasses off to read because im myopic.




    I guess I must have assumed wrong. Thanks for clearing it up. You are a
    hyperope with more latent hyperope and at your age, your accomodation
    decreasing.
     
    Ace, Aug 31, 2006
    #56
  17. Pat Coghlan

    Simon Dean Guest

    Two schools of thoughts, first there were different testers, and then
    there could be hypothyroidism issues. Havent exactly got a firm answer yet.
    Yes, I'd quite like to have a cycloplegic exam done. As for presbyopia,
    that only comes after about the age of 40 (usually) doesn't it?

    It's normal? Even for people who are plano? Mind you, I suppose part of
    the issue with pluses, they work like a magnifying glass don't they?


    Have a look for hyperthyroidism. That apparently with thyroid eye
    disease can push the eyeball out. I wondered whether being hypo could
    have the opposite effect. Certainly being hypo though could encourage
    you to lose a certain amount of muscle tone or control, which apparently
    is one of the reasons why people who are hypo, get excess acid - or
    maybe they don't get excess acid, it just has an easier time of coming
    up thereby creating heartburn. So it could be perfectly feasible that
    you aren't in control of your eyes as much when you're hypo. Certainly I
    think I've found a correlation between my vision and going back down in
    the trough of hypo.


    Never assume, Ace, it's a dangerous game.
     
    Simon Dean, Sep 1, 2006
    #57
  18. Pat Coghlan

    Ace Guest

    Simon Dean:
    Hope the doctors figure out this baffling case.



    Just ask your optometrist for cyclopentolate, cyclogyl. Presbyopia
    starts at birth but usually doesnt become an issue till your mid to
    late 30s if you are plano. Because you are hyperopic and may have more
    latently, you are feeling the effects earlier. Plus glasses sharpen
    things for near. Taking off my minus glasses does the same for me so I
    am mildly presbyopic or have reduced accomodation. Ive been told by an
    optometrist that myopes dont have as good accomodation because their
    eyes have adapted for near by becomming myopic and are used to seeing
    from near without glasses.


    You are +.75 which means you have to constantly accomodate so things
    come in focus behind your retina. This is not a large refractive error
    and is why you still see 20/20 distance and only slightly blurry near.
    Plus both magnify and sharpen, its the same when I put them over my
    full power distance glasses, things get bigger and sharper! Of course I
    just take my minus glasses off, tried putting plus just to see how it
    works.


    Ill have to read into this. If it happens to me, I will end up less
    myopic.



    People do that all the time :)
     
    Ace, Sep 2, 2006
    #58
  19. Pat Coghlan

    LarryDoc Guest

    More lies and misinformation. Why don't you pull the plug---on your
    useless life.
    WRONG. Presbyopia is defined, from the Latin route of the word as "old
    sight". It is a condition resulting from loss of accommodation due to
    age-related changes in the eye. Of course YOU might say that you begin
    dying the moment you are born.
    WRONG. YOU are a child. You do not have presbyopia.
    WRONG. ON the retina photoreceptors, NOT behind it.

    And how in hell did you make this up. Complete NONSENSE:

    GO AWAY>>>>>>
     
    LarryDoc, Sep 2, 2006
    #59
  20. Pat Coghlan

    Simon Dean Guest


    With respect, I wrote that.

    I know TED can affect hyperthyroid sufferers.

    I suffer from hypothyroidism and wondered if there might at all cause
    things to happen the opposite way to TED, some interaction with the eyes
    at least.

    What gets me wondering, is that my eyes are usually the first thing to
    go a bit blurry and tired. After a few months, I find my TSH is high and
    I need more thyroxine. Once I've actually got my thyroxine level
    adjusted, my eyes seem to miraculously return to plano. That could
    explain the rollercoaster eye prescription for myself.

    I hypothesised that there might be some issue with muscle control etc,
    given that people who have hypothyroidism do have problems with stomach
    acid, I've sometimes heard it suggested it's because when hypothyroid,
    you can have problems with the lower oesophageal sphincter. If that's
    the case maybe it could affect the muscles of the eye and explain
    problems with focusing.

    I have no idea if it's true, it's a promising idea, but Im not
    suggesting people with eye problems have thyroid problems though...

    Cya
    Simon
     
    Simon Dean, Sep 2, 2006
    #60
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