How soon after giving birth should my vision stabilize?

Discussion in 'Eye-Care' started by Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward, May 1, 2007.

  1. Hi,

    I had my second baby seven weeks ago, and noticed my vision has
    worsened since the delivery. I had something similar with the first
    baby, and it got better after a while, but this time it's worse than
    the first time. I was wondering how soon I can expect my vision to be
    stable enough so that I can get it checked.

    Thanks for your help!
     
    Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward, May 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward

    Guest Guest

    Congrats for the new baby, Hope everyone is doing well.
    Get your vision checked now so your doc can give you an idea. You
    don't need to wait til your vision stabilizes. Going in now will give
    the doc a better way to determine why and how your vision gets bad at
    child birth.
     
    Guest, May 2, 2007
    #2
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  3. Research indicates that vision stabilizes about two months after
    nursing is ended, however your individual experience may be different.
    It takes some time for the hormones related to pregnancy and lactation
    to return to pre-pregnancy levels.

    Glenn Hagele
    Executive Director
    USAEyes.org
    Patient Advocacy Surgeon Certification

    "Consider and Choose With Confidence"

    Email to glenn dot hagele at usaeyes dot org

    http://www.USAEyes.org

    Lasik Bulletin Board
    http://www.USAEyes.org/Ask-Lasik-Expert/

    I am not a doctor.

    Copyright 2007
    All Rights Reserved
     
    Glenn - USAEyes.org, May 2, 2007
    #3
  4. It might be best to get it checked now in order to find out what is
    causing this worsening.
     
    michael toulch, May 2, 2007
    #4
  5. Thanks for that. It sounds like it's related to the hormones then,
    rather than the greater blood volume in pregnancy, or the pushing at
    birth (these are some possible causes I've heard other mothers
    speculate about).
     
    Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward, May 2, 2007
    #5
  6. Fluctuation in visual acuity related to pregnancy and lactation is
    primarily due to changes in hormones. The vision fluctuations can
    occur early in pregnancy, long before dramatic changes in blood volume
    or the physical process of childbirth, and continue while nursing.

    Glenn Hagele
    Executive Director
    USAEyes.org
    Patient Advocacy Surgeon Certification

    "Consider and Choose With Confidence"

    Email to glenn dot hagele at usaeyes dot org

    http://www.USAEyes.org

    Lasik Bulletin Board
    http://www.USAEyes.org/Ask-Lasik-Expert/

    I am not a doctor.

    Copyright 2007
    All Rights Reserved
     
    Glenn - USAEyes.org, May 2, 2007
    #6
  7. Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward

    Guest Guest



    No offense to Glenn here, but relying on an internet diagnosis is not
    exactly smart. Go see your doctor.
     
    Guest, May 2, 2007
    #7
  8. No offense taken, and you are exactly correct.

    Glenn Hagele
    Executive Director
    USAEyes.org
    Patient Advocacy Surgeon Certification

    "Consider and Choose With Confidence"

    Email to glenn dot hagele at usaeyes dot org

    http://www.USAEyes.org

    Lasik Bulletin Board
    http://www.USAEyes.org/Ask-Lasik-Expert/

    I am not a doctor.

    Copyright 2007
    All Rights Reserved
     
    Glenn - USAEyes.org, May 2, 2007
    #8
  9. Sorry, I didn't realise you weren't a doctor. I was hoping to hear
    from a doctor about this phenomenon of vision worsening as a result of
    pregnancy.
     
    Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward, May 3, 2007
    #9
  10. Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward

    callimico66 Guest

    I was interested in your question--I had not heard that others
    experienced vision worsening due to pregnancy. I noticed it too--my
    myopia had been fairly stable, but then worsened after my 2
    pregnancies at 31 and 33. I thought it was because I was inside the
    house all the time, focusing my attention at close range on the new
    baby---and all the fatigue--not sleeping much at night and being
    exhausted from childbirth. I think I could have prevented the
    permanent worsening by going outside more, getting more exercise,
    eating better and getting better rest. I think I was a bit anemic,
    too.

    C
     
    callimico66, May 3, 2007
    #10
  11. Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward

    Guest Guest


    You still don't get it, do you? Even the best doctor on the planet
    CANNOT diagnose you over the internet.
     
    Guest, May 3, 2007
    #11
  12. Interesting. I did have gestational diabetes in both pregnancies. I
    went to an ophthalmologist at a walk-in clinic today for an eye
    checkup, and she wouldn't see me yet, saying I should come back no
    earlier than three months after giving birth in order for the vision
    to stabilise. She implied it was common knowledge that eye exams
    before three months postpartum are unreliable.
     
    Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward, May 13, 2007
    #12
  13. Thanks. I should have phrased my question differently, perhaps. I
    merely wanted to know if this was a known phenomenon, I was not
    looking for an internet diagnosis.
     
    Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward, May 13, 2007
    #13
  14. Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward

    serebel Guest


    Perhaps, but I also don't mean to come on heavy here either. I just
    don't want to see anyone get hurt by relying on what someone
    "diagnoses" on the web without being actually examined.
     
    serebel, May 13, 2007
    #14
  15. Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward

    retinula Guest

    It is certainly a known phenomenon in a minority of pregnancies.
    Commonly, tear film and hydration changes occur making contact lens
    wear in pregnancy different from contact lens wear otherwise. This is
    totally reversible and in my experience occurs within several weeks of
    delivery.

    Occasionally (<10%) significant refractive changes occur as a result
    of pregnancy. I generally believe the genesis of these changes to be
    underlying gestational diabetes although that's a difficult thing to
    prove. Usually the pregnant mother becomes more myopic, as would
    occur in an uncontrolled diabetic.

    I think waiting several months after delivery is a little on the
    conservative side. If I examine a pregnant woman and find a
    significant refractive change I usually tell them to come back for a
    re-refraction 3-4 weeks postpartum. In my experience what you
    commonly find is that the mother has returned to their prior
    refractive state.
     
    retinula, May 13, 2007
    #15
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