Laser treatment available for Ambyopia?

Discussion in 'Laser Eye Surgery' started by Rob Collier, Jun 4, 2004.

  1. Rob Collier

    Rob Collier Guest

    Hi All,

    I´ve suffered from a "Lazy Eye" since i was 6 years old. My parents
    didnt insist with me enough and I never used to wear my patch and
    pretty much im no better or worse now that im 25. I´ve never really
    worn glasses and various eye tests ive had along the years havent show
    any improvement nor have they shown either eye getting worse, my good
    eye has simply gotten used to being the "boss" and ive been told that
    wearing glasses isnt really worth it, especially since even the
    highest magnification doesnt improve my vision and ive always been
    told that "its too late" do do anything about it. Regarding laser
    surgery i was told by one doctor that it simply wasnt fixable.

    Up till now i havent really bothered with my eye(s) because i havent
    had any problems. Only a few days ago I took an eye test to apply for
    my drivers license and the outcome has been that im going to be
    imposed certain restrictions (speed, etc) and i must say it bummed me
    about. Since then ive been thinking about my condition and reading a
    bit about it on the internet, which i never bothered doing before. I
    was just wondering if it really is too late and if its worth me
    getting up of my arse and doing something about it.

    Any suggestions, advice or comments are welcome.
    Thank you for your time.
    Regards
    Rob.
     
    Rob Collier, Jun 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. Rob Collier

    Mark A Guest

    Yes, it is too late, from everything I have been told. There is nothing
    wrong with the eye itself (if your good eye went blind, the lazy eye would
    develop its full power). That is why children are asked to wear patches over
    their good eye--to develop the eye/brain coordination of the lazy eye. The
    problem is a muscle imbalance or other similar problem that causes the brain
    to ignore the lazy eye. So your lazy eye is similar the way it is at birth
    (the connection to the brain is not fully developed).

    Don't be too hard on yourself about the patch. It doesn't always work even
    if you wear it. Sometimes the lazy eye reverts back after the patch is
    removed. There are also other exercises that a doctor can administer that
    can help a young child with amblyopia.

    I am surprised that you have driving restrictions. In the states where I
    have had drivers licenses, I have never had restrictions because of my lazy
    eye (which is about 20/200), except that I must wear my glasses. I am
    farsighted. What state are you in?

    I am not a doctor, just a person with amblyopia.
     
    Mark A, Jun 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. Rob Collier

    Mark A Guest

    I have never seen a late model car without a right side mirror. Do you know
    of any?
     
    Mark A, Jun 4, 2004
    #3
  4. Rob Collier

    Dan Abel Guest


    Google says his address originates from the country of Niue, which I've
    never even heard of!


    Mapquest shows Niue to be east of Australia. When I zoom in, the map says
    American Samoa.
     
    Dan Abel, Jun 4, 2004
    #4
  5. Rob Collier

    Dan Abel Guest


    My wife is 54 and has amblyopia. She also was told that nothing could be
    done about it. For the first time, she had some problems with renewing
    her driver's license. In California, her only restriction is that she has
    to wear her glasses when driving, due to being farsighted in the good
    eye. They made her take a driving test to prove that she could drive with
    only one good eye.
     
    Dan Abel, Jun 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Rob Collier

    Dr Judy Guest

    Laser treatment can only improve vision to the same level that glasses would
    provide.

    Lazy eye can be due to a turned eye or due to large refractive error in the
    eye. If large refractive error is the cause of your lazy eye, and you used
    a patch at least some of the time when wyou were a child, then there is a
    very small chance that using glasses or contact lenses now and patching
    again may improve the vision. It is unlikely to improve it to be similar to
    the good eye. Your eye doctor is the person to ask, as the potential for
    success depends entirely upon the individual details of your particular
    case.

    Dr Judy
     
    Dr Judy, Jun 5, 2004
    #6
  7. Rob Collier

    Mark A Guest

    Also be advised that patching at 25 years of age may cause even worse
    problems, so many Dr's may be reluctant to even try it.
     
    Mark A, Jun 5, 2004
    #7
  8. Rob Collier

    Mark A Guest

    Every year? You don't have to buy a new car every year to get a late model
    car. I mean a car made within the last 7-10 years. Even if such cars exist
    without right hand mirror's, would you really want one? There are plenty of
    older cars that have them.
     
    Mark A, Jun 5, 2004
    #8
  9. Rob Collier

    Rob Collier Guest

    I live in Spain.
    The restriction is going to be having to use both external mirrors (which of
    course are standard anyway) and an interior "panoramic" mirror. This, as you
    probably know, is simply an attachment on to your exisiting interior
    rearview mirror.
    I am also going to have a speed restriction which I´ve been told will be
    imposed when I pass my test. Probably 80 or 100km/h
    Also I have to renew my license every 2 years.

    The thing is I went to the optician about a month ago to get some glasses
    for driving, but the optician said look, even with the highest magnification
    you still cant see any better and your good eye is perfectly accostumed so
    it would be a waste of money/time.

    If only using glasses I would be able to see the chart well enough for them
    to let me drive without restrictions, I would be happy.

    Regards
    Rob
     
    Rob Collier, Jun 5, 2004
    #9
  10. Rob Collier

    Rob Collier Guest

    ..nu is my domain.
    Im actually in Spain (usually .es) :)
    Rob
     
    Rob Collier, Jun 5, 2004
    #10
  11. Rob Collier

    Rob Collier Guest

    Thanks.
    This is basically what I was curious about. Wheather it was actually
    feesable (sp?) to even attempt to try using patches or some form of exersise
    at this stage.
    Rob
     
    Rob Collier, Jun 5, 2004
    #11
  12. Rob Collier

    Mark A Guest

    In the US (all the states I have lived in) there is no restriction so long
    as one eye is correctable to about 20/20 (not exactly sure what the exact
    number is because my good eye is correctable to 20/20. But I believe that
    all cars in the US have right side mirrors and fairly wide rear view mirrors
    (although not exactly panoramic).
     
    Mark A, Jun 5, 2004
    #12
  13. Rob Collier

    The Real Bev Guest

    They never seem to require that the mirrors be adjusted correctly. If
    you don't have a passenger-side mirror when you rent a trailer, you have
    to rent a mirror (another $5 or so). They slap it on and off you drive
    -- too much trouble to adjust it properly. Likewise the right-side
    mirror on my truck, which requires two people and a wrench to adjust.

    I've (California) never heard of that particular restriction, just no
    night or freeway driving or increased frequency of license renewal.

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
    "Few skills are so well rewarded as the ability to convince
    parasites that they are victims." --Thomas Sowell
     
    The Real Bev, Jun 6, 2004
    #13
  14. Rob Collier

    Mark A Guest

    They never seem to require that the mirrors be adjusted correctly. If
    Are you saying that people with amblyopia (or one eye not correctable to
    20/40) cannot drive at night or on freeways in California? That sounds like
    capital punishment to me.

    If that is true, I will never be moving to California (although I have been
    there many times driving on business and vacation).
     
    Mark A, Jun 6, 2004
    #14
  15. Rob Collier

    The Real Bev Guest

    I think it depends on the particular vision problem. The vehicle code
    is on line, but is SUCH a pain to look through that I'm not willing to
    do it, although many others have most generously done so for me.
     
    The Real Bev, Jun 7, 2004
    #15
  16. Rob Collier

    Mark A Guest

    They never seem to require that the mirrors be adjusted correctly. If
    I found the code for California. There is no automatic restriction on night
    driving and freeways for amblyopia. It depends partly on what your eye
    doctor recommends. I don' think there would be a problem for me, but I might
    have to get a note from a eye doctor.
     
    Mark A, Jun 7, 2004
    #16
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