Mile Tyner?

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by bg, Jul 12, 2003.

  1. bg

    bg Guest

    Bingo!

    Episcleritis is what a couple opthal. said it probably was.
    She does say their is pain and their is redness. Almost
    always confined to one eye.
    They did give her some drops. What is the normal prognosis
    for this disease?
    Eventual blindness? Visual deterioration?

    What is the prognosis for some of the other diseases you
    mentioned?
    Is the paid caused by eye dryness which could be alleviated
    by punct. plugs?

    Does it ever get better on its own?

    Are the drops immune system inhibitors?

    I'm doing a search on this now.


    thanks
     
    bg, Jul 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. bg

    Mike Tyner Guest

    Nah.. only if it isn't treated.
    Pretty good these days. I've seen Enbrel give miraculous relief in RA.
    Not sure I understand, but it doesn't sound like dry eye is relevant.
    Probably steroids to quell the inflammation.

    -MT
     
    Mike Tyner, Jul 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. bg

    bg Guest

    What is the difference between scleritis and episcleritis?
    What does the epi mean?

    What is the difference between a Corticosteroid and a
    Steroid?

    Can epi progress to scleritis or are they entirely
    different diseases?

    Melting.... that sounds bad... very bad. Wicked witch
    from the Wizard of OZ bad.
     
    bg, Jul 13, 2003
    #3
  4. bg

    Dr. Leukoma Guest

    Episcleritis affects the episclera, the membrane between the conjunctiva
    and the sclera. It does not turn into scleritis, which affects the sclera.
    A steroid is a hormone. A corticosteroid is a specific type of hormone
    secreted by the adrenal cortex, and is involved in mediating inflammation.
    Corticosteroids are used to treat inflammation of the eye, such as
    episcleritis.

    Episcleritis is common. Necrotizing scleritis is not. And you're right:
    scleritis is bad.
     
    Dr. Leukoma, Jul 14, 2003
    #4
  5. bg

    Mike Tyner Guest

    Agreed.

    And scleritis makes the sclera look blue or slate gray, not red.

    -MT
     
    Mike Tyner, Jul 14, 2003
    #5
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