Post-LASIK ECTASIA is alive and well

Discussion in 'Laser Eye Surgery' started by Wizkid, Oct 31, 2004.

  1. Wizkid

    Wizkid Guest

    Just returned from the AAO. Ectasia, as has been discussed earlier on
    this site, is more prevalent than what is being discussed publicly.
    Surgeons who are concerned are moving towards PRK for certain "higher
    risk" patients. One focus group of twenty surgeons that I sat in with,
    were polled on what procedure they would have. All said that they
    would have PRK.

    Addition Technologies, the manufacturer of INTACS prescription
    inserts, is experiencing solid revenue growth due to INTACS for both
    the treatment of post-LASIK ectasia, keratoconus, and now low myopia
    (its original indication). Addition is a privately held company, but
    from what I could gather, INTACS may be the fastest growing refractive
    procedure in the US.

    From talking to their reps, Post-LASIK ectasia is being experienced
    across the board - high and low volume LASIK practices, and without
    regard to years of experience. I was reminded of Dr.Michel
    Kritzinger's comment, before he was killed, in 2000 when he stated
    publicly that Intacs would prove to be the life bouy for LASIK.
    Kritzinger was a highly regarded, high volume LASIK surgeon from South
    Africa.

    Ectasia continues to be the elephant in the room that no one wants to
    talk about.
     
    Wizkid, Oct 31, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Ongoing WizKid scare tactics. Tell us WizKid, since you have made
    yourself the resident expert on LASIK related ectasia, what is the
    exact current rate of ectasia? Provide substantiation please.

    Glenn Hagele
    Executive Director
    Council for Refractive Surgery Quality Assurance

    Email to glenn dot hagele at usaeyes dot org

    http://www.USAEyes.org
    http://www.ComplicatedEyes.org

    I am not a doctor.
     
    Glenn Hagele - Council for Refractive Surgery Qual, Oct 31, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.