Preventing myopia in children with OrthoK? Proven or nonsense?

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by Eye, Sep 28, 2007.

  1. Eye

    Eye Guest

    There is a comanaging OD who practices in my town. He talked a long-
    time patient into having LASIK and it ruined her vision and comfort.
    He has attempted to fit damaged LASIK patients with hard lenses and
    failed. Still he comanages. He had an amateur boxer ready to have
    LASIK - until I had a chat with the young man and explained he'd have
    his flaps knocked off in no time if he went through with the LASIK
    surgery. Definitely not for people who are involved in contact sports.

    That's the background. Here is the issue...

    This doctor saw the son of some friends of mine. Like his parents, the
    10 year old boy is myopic. The doctor volunteered that while the boy
    is 'too young for LASIK' (vulgar that he'd even suggest the surgery
    that has ruined eyes and lives of other patients in his practice) his
    myopia may be slowed and ultimately reduced in magnitude if he were to
    wear OrthoK lenses now. He claimed that OrthoK lenses were like 'eye
    braces' that prevent the development of further myopia, and that the
    child's endpoint of myopia would be reduced with this therapy. He went
    on to claim that there is literature to support the efficacy of this
    therapy in preventing the progression of myopia in children.

    I think this is utter horse shit. I would like to find Dr. Ken Minarik
    and others on this board who have information in this area and get to
    the bottom of this question!

    It woudl be good to know if this doctor is as sleazy as a LASIK
    surgeon.
     
    Eye, Sep 28, 2007
    #1
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  2. Eye

    serebel Guest

    The above poster is a long time internet liar and loser. She has more
    "personalities" as Zetsu. Nothing she has ever posted has been true,
    nothing.
     
    serebel, Sep 28, 2007
    #2
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  3. Eye

    otisbrown Guest

    Dear Eye too Am Darma,

    Subject: Ortho-K -- good and bad?

    A man with only a hammer -- will see every problem as a "nail".

    There is no doubt that you can change the refractive STATE
    of the eye by 2 diopters with an Orth-K lens. Pilots will
    use it (sleep in it) to pass the 20/20 line for the FAA
    exam.

    But they know the risks, and choose naked-eye 20/20 as
    a professional requirement.

    But young children? The long-term effects of a the
    use of Otho-K as simply not known.

    To "promote" it is excessive, unless the parents and
    child are informed of the potential risks of doing it -- long
    term.

    It is also rather expensive, about $1,400. Further
    it does not "last". If you quit wearing the "retainers", you
    go right back down to you previous refractive STATE.

    Like all things "medical" -- the parents should be informed
    of the risks of doing Ortho-K for a young child.

    Just my second-opinion.

    Otis
     
    otisbrown, Sep 28, 2007
    #3
  4. Eye

    Neil Brooks Guest

    Sorry. Rishi Giovanni Gatti (Zetsu), Lena102938, and Otis Brown are
    trolls who haunt s.m.v.

    Rishi has published, and is trying to sell worthless books.

    Otis is pathologically dishonest and actually hurts people.
    Following his advice can induce double vision in those
    not working closely with an eye doctor.

    Lena102938 uses anti-eye doctor rhetoric as a substitute for ANY
    actual information. It seems she now has to wear glasses and has
    developed a pathological (and ILLOGICAL) resentment toward the
    industry that "foisted these glasses upon her."

    You'd do well to ignore them and wait for responses from the
    caring, compassionate eye doctors who DO also participate in this site.
     
    Neil Brooks, Sep 28, 2007
    #4
  5. Eye

    serebel Guest

    Notice how one lies(EYE) and the moron(Otis) will swear to it.
     
    serebel, Sep 29, 2007
    #5
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