Problem with prescription sunglasses

Discussion in 'Glasses' started by Nachiketa Sahoo, Jun 17, 2006.

  1. Hi,

    I got a pair of prescription sunglasses from Costco recently. This is
    the first time I am wearing any prescription glasses. And I am having a
    lot of trouble right away. I am shortsighted. I was wearing -1.25
    glasses. I got a new prescription for these glasses and they
    recommended that I wear -1.5. Also, they said that I can keep wearing
    my -1.25 regular glasses and use these -1.5 sunglasses, without any
    problem. So, I got them made to -1.5. FYI I don't require any other
    correction.

    For the first couple of days I was wearing them for 10-15mins in sun
    and they were great. They cut glare and harsh sunlight. They are gray
    in color. These are polarised and claim UV protection. But, yesterday I
    wore them for couple of hours in sun and my eyes hurt like hell. I was
    not sure whether it was due to the sunglasses or something else. Then I
    wore them today for some time, but, after an hour or so of wearing them
    in sun, my eyes started hurting badly again. Once I reverted back to my
    regular glasses, I was fine within minutes.

    I took it back to Costco and they looked at both my glasses and told me
    that it could be that the new glasses are not fitting well enough and
    so, some light might be coming in around the edges. So, the person
    there tried to reshape the frame a bit and hoped that it'll be fix the
    problem. The other thing that he said might be the problem was that my
    eyes might be struggling with the change of glass power from 1.25 to
    1.5. My *guess* was that probably the sunglasses are not of good
    quality, i.e., they don't block enough of sun ray and trick my pupil to
    open up too much, leading to the above problem. Sort of another
    hypothesis.

    At least they have good return policy. He said I was welcome to return
    them and get a refund if what he did does not solve my problems.

    Does anyone ever had this kind of problem? Any thought as to what could
    be causing problem?

    Thanks,
    N
     
    Nachiketa Sahoo, Jun 17, 2006
    #1
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  2. Small typo: this is the first time I am wearing any prescription
    sunglasses. I have been wearing prescription glasses for 9 years.
     
    Nachiketa Sahoo, Jun 17, 2006
    #2
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  3. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Dick Adams Guest

    Sometimes stylish eyeglasses, particularly sunglasses, are made according
    to a "wrap-around" design. So your eyes looked slantedly through the
    lenses. There could be a question of whether the optical centers of the
    lenses are corrected for the tilt of the lenses.

    It is surprising how frequently purveyors of eyeglasses are not aware that
    eyeglasses perform best when they are flat to the eyes, as opposed to
    tilted to achieve the appearance of being "streamlined".
     
    Dick Adams, Jun 18, 2006
    #3
  4. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Quick Guest

    Not sure of your point here Dicky. Are you saying the
    manufacturers make tilted sunglasses and don't account
    for it? or that the sellers bend them and don't account for
    it?

    -Quick
     
    Quick, Jun 18, 2006
    #4
  5. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Dick Adams Guest

    I dunno if they could or should be held to account. They have
    to make a living, and, with population exploding the way it does,
    there's many more than one sucker born each minute.

    We could oppose them on the grounds of good optical design,
    but the answer will obviously be that people like the swept-back
    lenses and one simply does one's best to supply what people want.

    Quite likely it can be shown that the incremental accommodative load
    for a 1.5D myope peering though lenses toed out by 15 degrees is
    substantially within the bounds of reason, with prismatic, chromatic,
    astigmatic, and pincushional distortion remaining entirely unaffected,
    essentially.

    Notwithstanding, the OP might continue to be affected by headaches.
    Well, vergence stresses could be obviated by using only one eye at a
    time. He could try that.
     
    Dick Adams, Jun 18, 2006
    #5
  6. These sunglasses are almost exactly like my glasses. No wrap around
    nothing. Just like a pair of glasses but gray. I am not sure why that
    might cause problem.

    N
     
    Nachiketa Sahoo, Jun 18, 2006
    #6
  7. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Dick Adams Guest

    Then I dunno. I am only an amateur optometrist, and, though I have
    several merit badges in opthamology, I am not actually medically
    qualified.

    Perhaps you are overcorrected by the additional -0.25D. Maybe
    the centers do not fit the distance between your pupils. Maybe the
    gray lets through some distress-causing UV or infra-red.

    Me, I always wear a baseball cap with sunglasses. Even then, the
    sun finds its way around the tinted plastic in many mysterious ways.

    The sun is bad for your skin anyway. Maybe you should just stay
    out of it?
     
    Dick Adams, Jun 18, 2006
    #7
  8. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Dick Adams Guest

    Certainly you should know that extreme gazing is what makes people bug-eyed.
     
    Dick Adams, Jun 18, 2006
    #8
  9. You just don't say that to someone in pittsburgh, where, sun is so
    rare.

    I guess I'll keep using my normal glasses in sun and let my pupil do
    the adjustment to protect my eyes from to sun.

    N
     
    Nachiketa Sahoo, Jun 18, 2006
    #9
  10. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Quick Guest

    What does this mean? Are you a certified optometrist
    and just not practicing professionally? What are "merit
    badges in opthamology"?

    Someone might easily construe this to mean that you
    do, in fact, have some medical qualifications. Is that
    the case?

    -Quick
     
    Quick, Jun 18, 2006
    #10
  11. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Ann Guest

    You should always assume on here that nobody has anything. They might
    say they do when they don't anyway. Just read what they say and take
    the advice if you like depending on what it is, and/or do more
    research.

    Ann
     
    Ann, Jun 18, 2006
    #11
  12. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Dick Adams Guest

    I have no qualification to practice any kind of medicine.
    The Boy Scout organization is not authorized to issue
    merit badges in opthomology. Optometry is not a field of
    medicine, so amateur optometrists do not so frequently
    go to jail.

    I hope this helps.
     
    Dick Adams, Jun 19, 2006
    #12
  13. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Dick Adams Guest

    Does the anonymous poster feel I may be unqualified for that?
    In all cases should be. But who has time to check up on 'em all?

    (I have pointed out that the opthamologists very frequently rely upon
    in-house trained phoropter jockeys. Theoretically, one might expect
    that photopter operators who have received institutional training
    would do better refractions.)
    For instance, one can hope that they are proficient in the use of the basic
    tools of their trade, like the phoropter, for instance, and are competent
    to write scripts for eyeglasses.
    "Amateur medical doctor" is undefined. Quack doctors frequently get
    busted.

    Several examples of amateur optometrist are seen here at sci.med.vision.
    Even the most notorious of them has never done a day of jail time.

    It is my hope to set a shining example for the amateur optometrists of
    sci.med.vision. I will start with good posting style and use of the spell
    checker. Maybe one day I will work up to an eBay phoropter and
    lens checker so I can help people figure out why their eyeglasses are
    not working out.
     
    Dick Adams, Jun 19, 2006
    #13
  14. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    sceptborg Guest

    Does the polarising work?
    My test is to look out to sea, (or at a shiny road).
    The water should look darkish.
    If you keep your head still and rotate the lens 10 degrees either way you
    start to see shine.
    Or in the office look at the light reflected off a piece of white paper and
    rotate another correctly polarised lens in front of your lens.
    The paper should go very dark when the other lens is at 90 degrees.
    I have had a case of one lens being OK and the other eye being off by 20
    degrees, giving a weird affect when looking at road reflections.
    However the manufacturer just dismissed this as manufacturing tolerances.
     
    sceptborg, Jun 19, 2006
    #14
  15. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Dick Adams Guest

    For one thing, "optometrist", like "doctor", is a generic category, and does
    not take capitalization unless it is a title, like Dr. as in Dr. Smith, for instance.

    This seems to me to be a political rather than a semantical consideration.

    It is a fact of life that medical doctors have very strong unions and can, with
    magnificent adeptitude, destroy any person, corporate body, or governmental
    entity which threatens to usurp the smallest fragment of their thunder.

    On the other hand, optometrists are advanced technicians who have recently
    risen from the mundane task of measuring refractive error and prescribing
    eyeglasses.

    Now that they have left all that behind, business is quite good with contact
    lenses, referrals to eye surgeons, and the management of the aftermaths and
    complications of such things, not to mention cosmetic counseling and the
    elevation of eyeglasses to aristocratic accoutrements and beauty aides. The
    eyeglass customer who, years ago, with a competent refraction, might not
    return for a decade or more, is now a "patient" who will probably be back
    within three weeks, and has need of a steady supply of after-market necessities,
    accessories, and replacement items.

    An amateur optometrist, on the other hand, has nothing to sell, and is just
    trying to figure out what is going on. He may wonder, from time to time, if
    he could get some eyeglasses which would provide sharper vision. Some
    have wondered if there is any way to improve bad vision other than eyeglasses
    and similar stuff, and if there is any hope for the prevention of ruining one's eyes
    before it is too late.
     
    Dick Adams, Jun 19, 2006
    #15
  16. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    The Real Bev Guest

    Or at a VW bug rear window -- a lovely pattern will emerge if the
    glasses are polarized.

    --
    Cheers, Bev
    =========================================================
    "I believe that forgiving [terrorists] is God's function.
    Our job is to arrange the meeting."
    - Norman Schwartzkopf
     
    The Real Bev, Jun 20, 2006
    #16
  17. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Dick Adams Guest

    Yes, I did. I learned that ploy from attempting to converse
    with Professional People.
    Well, try this, then:
    I am one;
    Otis is one;
    Ace is one;
    Bev is a rather good one;
    Then there are the sci.med.vision watchdogs who are deciding
    what is appropriate for folks to post -- why not include them?

    Obviously, there are considerable ranges of proficiency and
    competence.
    Yes, to varying degrees. Sometimes quite benignly, even usefully
    on occasion.
    I do a lot of work on myself. With wall charts and diagrams, and
    particularly with signs and neon displays at night, I can figure out
    what is wrong with my prescription. Check my work with a pair
    of Zennis. It is an incremental thing. Last time I got it right by the
    third pair. Also I have some uncut lenses -.25D and -.50D, but
    they are no longer useful since I am no longer progressively myopic
    due to recent IOL installation.

    Also I can give some good advice to my wife but she cannot take
    me seriously because she knows I am unprofessional. I am a
    pretty good plumber, too, but we just paid $300 to a professional
    plumber to fix a faucet, on account of lack of trust. We pay a lot
    for eyeglasses, for the same reason.
    Another thing us amateur optometrists do is to check out the phoropter
    operators. Ophthalmologists are the worst. Optometrists can be quite good,
    but they frequently have agendas, particularly if they have fancy eyeglasses
    and contact lenses to sell (and little time if they are busy managing the
    trials and complications of contact lenses) or if they have relatives or
    in-laws who are eye surgeons. Among 6 or 7 phoroptrists who have
    done me in the last several decades, the best two were ladies who's training
    was on-the-job.
     
    Dick Adams, Jun 20, 2006
    #17
  18. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    drfrank21 Guest


    That kills me. I think that proctologists could also use your
    "expertise" to
    check out the procto operators. Maybe you could report back and
    let us know who performed the best procto exams, who gave you the
    "best finger" so to speak. Because you sure do seem to be multi-
    talented.

    frank
     
    drfrank21, Jun 20, 2006
    #18
  19. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    Dick Adams Guest

    Actually, Doctor, the urologist is the more usual finger tester.
    (They call it a "digital" test, but it is a very low-tech procedure.)
    After you pass 50 (years of age), you can start checking 'em out.
    Or you can avoid them altogether. Sooner or later they will/would
    start sticking needles up your ass and recommending unmentionable
    procedures.
     
    Dick Adams, Jun 20, 2006
    #19
  20. Nachiketa  Sahoo

    drfrank21 Guest

    See. You're already an expert! Now go play amateur proctologist along
    with Otis (you're both good at bull shitting). I'm sure they are in
    need
    of some groupies.

    frank
     
    drfrank21, Jun 20, 2006
    #20
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