School Children at the Clinic

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by Lelouch Lamperouge, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. [...]

    ——
    Stories from the Clinic
    18: The School Children Again
    By Emily C. Lierman
    ——
    We have so many interesting cases among the children sent to us
    from the schools to be fitted with glasses that one hardly knows where
    to begin when trying to tell about them. Little Agnes, eight years
    old, comes to my mind, not because she was more remarkable than a good
    many others, but because she came recently. Her mother came with her,
    and told me that Agnes suffered from frequent headaches and that for
    the past year her teachers had been saying that she needed glasses, as
    she had great difficulty in seeing the blackboard. The mother had
    hesitated to take her to an oculist, however, as two of her children
    were already wearing glasses and she did not want to see them on a
    third.
    I could easily see that Agnes was suffering, and when I tested her
    eyes with the Snellen test card I found that her vision was very poor.
    At fifteen feet she could not read more than the seventy line. This
    was so surprising in so young a child that I thought at first she did
    not know her letters; but when I tested her with pothooks she did no
    better. I now showed her how to palm, and in a few moments she read
    the bottom line. The mother was thrilled and said:
    "My goodness! When I first entered this room my hope was gone. I
    could think of nothing but glasses for my child. When she read the
    card and I saw how bad her eyes were, I was convinced that there was
    no escape for her. But now that I see her vision improved so quickly I
    have hope indeed."
    I told the mother that I was thrilled myself, and added that she
    could help me to cure the child if she would.
    "What I do for her here you can do for her at home," I said.
    "Encourage her to rest her eyes. Nature requires rest for the eyes,
    but your little girl, instead of closing her eyes when they are tired,
    strains to keep them open."
    The mother promised to do all she could, and as she was leaving
    she said:
    "God sent me here. I will send my two boys to be rid of their
    glasses also."
    The next clinic day Agnes brought with her her brother Peter, who
    was wearing glasses for astigmatism and headaches. He was very
    attentive while I treated Agnes, who told me that she had not been
    having her usual headaches. Peter's vision I found to be 15/40, right
    eye, and 15/15, left eye. After palming only a few minutes his right
    eye improved to 15/15 and his left to 15/10. He was very happy when
    told that he did not need glasses any more, and that I could cure him
    during vacation. As children are cured very quickly when one helps the
    other at home, I expect that Agnes and Peter will soon be reading
    20/10, which is twice what the normal eye is expected to do.
    Another recent patient was Mary, a colored girl, twelve years old.
    She complained of such violent headaches that she could no longer
    attend school and stayed in bed most of the time. The school nurse had
    advised glasses, and she had come to get them. Mary kept her head
    lowered much of the time, but when I was about to treat her she tried
    to open one eye and look at me. The effort was so great that her face
    became a mass of wrinkles. As the light seemed to distress her, I
    decided to give her the light treatment, that is to focus the rays of
    the sun on the upper part of her eyeballs with a burning glass. I
    asked her to sit on a stool where the sun could shine on her eyes, but
    when I tried to use the burning glass she was frightened to death. To
    reassure her I asked a patient who had already had the treatment to
    let me repeat it on her, and when Mary saw her enjoy the light bath
    she readily submitted to it herself. Afterward her eyes opened wide
    and I was able to test her sight. Her vision was 20/30, both eyes. I
    showed her how to palm, and when, after ten minutes, she opened her
    eyes, her pain was gone and her vision perfect. I was quite proud to
    have accomplished so much in one treatment.
    Two days later Mary came again, and with her came the school nurse
    and a friend, both eager to hear more of the miracle that had been
    worked on Mary. Could it be possible, the nurse asked, that the child
    had been cured as quickly as she said? I was surprised myself at the
    change in the patient's appearance. Her eyes were still wide open, and
    the constant grin on her face made her almost unrecognizable as the
    sad creature I had seen two days before. I told the nurse what had
    been done for the child and how she could help the other children in
    her school who had eye trouble. She came a few times more to watch our
    methods, and told me that she was teaching all the children sent to
    her for examination of their eyes to palm. This always relieved them,
    to some extent, at once. The hard cases, however, she sent to us
    without delay.
    A very remarkable case still under treatment is that of a girl
    with nystagmus, a condition in which the eyes vibrate from side to
    side. The child is now so much improved that ordinarily her eyes are
    normal, but when anything disturbs her the vibration returns. This
    always happens, she tells me, when the teacher asks her a question,
    and at the same time she loses her memory. But the teacher allows her
    to cover her eyes to rest them, and in a few minutes the vibration
    ceases and her memory improves. Before she came to the clinic, she
    often became hysterical and was obliged to leave the classroom. Now
    she is never troubled in this way.
    One of the most puzzling cases I ever had was sent by the school
    nurse for glasses. A patient who came from the same school told me
    that she was stupid, and she certainly appeared to be so. I asked her
    if she knew her letters, and in trying to reply she stuttered
    painfully. I tried to reassure her by speaking as gently as I could
    but without avail. I could not get her to answer intelligently. I
    tried having her palm, but it did not help. I held the test card close
    to her eyes, and asked her to point out certain letters as I named
    them, but only in a few cases did she do this correctly. Completely
    baffled I appealed to Dr. Bates. He asked the child to come to him and
    touch a button on his coat, and she did so. He asked her to touch
    another button, but she answered:
    "I don't see them."
    "Look down at your shoes," he said. "Do you see them?"
    "No," she answered.
    "Go over and put your finger on the door-knob," he said, and she
    immediately did so.
    "It is a case of hysterical blindness," the doctor said.
    The child came for some time very regularly, and now reads 15/10
    with both eyes. She has stopped stuttering, and has lost her
    reputation for stupidity. She has become a sort of good samaritan in
    her neighborhood, for every once in a while she brings with her some
    little companion to be cured of imperfect sight. She never has any
    doubts as to our capacity to do this, and so far we have never
    disappointed her. I hope she never brings anyone who is beyond our
    power to help, for I would be sorry to see that sublime faith which we
    have inspired in her shattered.
    Two of our patients graduated in June, and after the final
    examination they told me that they had been greatly helped in these
    tests by the memory of a swinging black period. One of them was told
    by the principal that if she failed to pass it would not be because of
    her stupidity, but because she refused to wear glasses. She gave him
    Dr. Bates' book, and after that, though he watched her closely, he did
    not say anything more about her eyes.
    "I made up my mind to pass without the aid of glasses," she said,
    "and put one over on the principal, and you bet I never lost sight of
    my precious swinging period. The book has become a family treasure,"
    she continued. "When one of us has a pain in head or eyes, out it
    comes. It is a natural thing to see mother palming after her work is
    done. She enjoys her evenings with us now, because palming rests her
    and she does not get so sleepy."
    The other graduate said: "I did not have to think of a black
    period when the subject was easy, but when I had to answer questions
    in the more difficult branches I certainly did find the period a
    lifesaver. I know I would have failed without it."
    ——
    School Number
    Better Eyesight
    A monthly magazine devoted to the prevention and cure of imperfect
    sight without glasses
    Vol. V - August, 1921 - No. 2
    Copyright, 1921, by the Central Fixation Publishing Company
    Editor—W. H. Bates, M.D.
    Publisher—Central Fixation Publishing Co.
    Doctors are needed all over the world to cure people without glasses
    $2.00 per year, 20 cents per copy
    300 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y.
    ——

    [...]
     
    Lelouch Lamperouge, Nov 30, 2009
    #1
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  2. Lelouch Lamperouge

    Otis Guest

    And the preventive second-opinion is:

    http://myopiafree.i-see.org/soonicansee/index.html

    Enjoy,



     
    Otis, Nov 30, 2009
    #2
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  3. Lelouch Lamperouge

    Otis Guest

    Is prevention the best idea?



    Enjoy,


     
    Otis, Dec 1, 2009
    #3
  4. Lelouch Lamperouge

    Otis Guest

    The second-opinion on the effect of an over-prescribed minus on the
    eye.

    http://www.chinamyopia.org/


     
    Otis, Dec 1, 2009
    #4
  5. Lelouch Lamperouge

    Neil Brooks Guest

    Sure.

    Anything you know of that has been proven both safe and effective?

    You've certainly never shown us anything.

    Also, perhaps you should stay away from threads that reference
    children.

    Could invoke a TRO, Uncle Otie.
     
    Neil Brooks, Dec 1, 2009
    #5
  6. Lelouch Lamperouge

    Neil Brooks Guest

    How ARE his kids doing?

    I'm guessing ... myopic ... like your niece, Joy -- the results of
    YOUR failed experiment.

    Also ... in re: this "second-opinion" crap: we're all still waiting
    for you to present your First Fact.
     
    Neil Brooks, Dec 1, 2009
    #6
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