Silicone Hydrogel Torics

Discussion in 'Optometry Archives' started by MS, May 25, 2009.

  1. MS

    MS Guest

    There are a few available now.

    First there was only Purevision Toric, but now also Acuvue Advance (are they
    si-hy?), o2 Optix (or are they AirOptix), and Biofinity toric. I believe
    those all have toric flavors now. (Funny, that many don't use toric in the
    name describing them--like "AirOptix for Astigmatism". Why not just call
    them AirOptix Toric? I don't know why they think they will sell more that
    way ) (Do they sell their plain lenses as "AirOptix for Myopia"?) (They
    could sell the plano colored lenses as **(brand name) for Vanity". ;-) )

    Anyhow, there are three or four silicone hydrogel toric lenses available
    now, AFAIK. I would be interested in hearing from doctors who have
    prescribed them, and patients who have tried more than one of these, a
    comparison between advantages and disadvantages of the different brands of
    si-hy torics.

    By the way, which of them has the highest DK/T? (I remember a chart on the
    net a few years ago, with the dkt ratings of the brands available at that
    time. Is there an updated list somewhere, with all the current materials?)

    What factors would cause you to choose one rather than another?
     
    MS, May 25, 2009
    #1
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  2. MS

    The Real Bev Guest

    NO SHIT!

    --
    Cheers, Bev
    =============================================================
    "On the other hand, I live in California so I'd be willing to
    squeeze schoolchildren to death if I thought some oil would
    come out." -- Scott Adams
     
    The Real Bev, May 27, 2009
    #2
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  3. MS

    mpace99 Guest

    The lens that best fits the patient: centration, rotation, visual
    acuity, comfort. These all depend more on the particular details of
    the patient's eye and how it interacts with the lens than the details
    of the lens.

    Dr Judy
     
    mpace99, May 27, 2009
    #3

  4. purevision toric -- slightly smaller diameter and firmer plastic (hi
    modulus) makes this an easy lens for 1st time wearers to train with.
    it is suitable for EW. there is moderate rotational instability and
    oftentimes significant comfort issues in some patients using this
    lens.

    acuvue advance for astigmatism-- good fit and rotational stability.
    sometimes problems with easy accumulation of deposits. lens material
    folds easily and can be difficult to handle for 1st time wearers.

    acuvue oasys for astigmatism-- much improved over acuvue adv for
    astig. better handling, less deposits, etc. probably my favorite
    toric at the present time

    air optix for astig-- moderate rotational instability. reasonable
    comfort and handling for most patients. the problem with this lens
    IMHO is it is overpriced when compared to others that out-perform it.
     
    bluegrass native, UK alum '76, May 29, 2009
    #4
  5. MS

    MS Guest

    Thanks for all the info, to you and others who responded.

    How does the dk/t compare with these lenses? Since toric lenses are thicker,
    and therefore i assume have less permeability than non-toric lenses of the
    same material, i would assume it is good to have as permeable a material as
    possible, especially if one wears them overnight?

    is the Airoptix the most permeable soft toric? (If so, perhaps that accounts
    for the price?) Of those listed, is the Advance the least permeable? The
    others in between? (Anyone have the exact numbers?)


    purevision toric -- slightly smaller diameter and firmer plastic (hi
    modulus) makes this an easy lens for 1st time wearers to train with.
    it is suitable for EW. there is moderate rotational instability and
    oftentimes significant comfort issues in some patients using this
    lens.

    acuvue advance for astigmatism-- good fit and rotational stability.
    sometimes problems with easy accumulation of deposits. lens material
    folds easily and can be difficult to handle for 1st time wearers.

    acuvue oasys for astigmatism-- much improved over acuvue adv for
    astig. better handling, less deposits, etc. probably my favorite
    toric at the present time

    air optix for astig-- moderate rotational instability. reasonable
    comfort and handling for most patients. the problem with this lens
    IMHO is it is overpriced when compared to others that out-perform it.
     
    MS, May 29, 2009
    #5
  6. MS

    MS Guest

    Of course permeability isn't everything, as you say.

    Of course comfort and stability are very important. And of course--vision!

    But, what if two lens models are equal in all those areas on a specific
    patient, yet one is significantly more permeable than the other, and the
    patient IS sleeping in them? Wouldn't in that case it make sense to go with
    the more permeable lens type? Of course though, if the less permeable lens
    is more comfortable, better vision, etc., then that's a different story.
     
    MS, Jun 8, 2009
    #6
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