Wow poor kid and his thick myodisc glasses!

Discussion in 'Glasses' started by acemanvx, Jul 21, 2006.

  1. acemanvx

    acemanvx Guest

    acemanvx, Jul 21, 2006
    #1
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  2. acemanvx

    acemanvx Guest

    acemanvx, Jul 21, 2006
    #2
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  3. acemanvx

    otisbrown Guest

    Dear AceMan,

    That is what is going to happen to that 20/50 kid -- who was
    put into a -10 diopters -- for no good reason.

    I truly pity these poor kids -- and the consequence of that
    over-prescribed minus lens.

    Just one man's opinion.

    Otis
     
    otisbrown, Jul 21, 2006
    #3
  4. acemanvx

    Quick Guest

    Or he could end up doing halucinogenics, living in his room,
    looking for attention on the internet. Even SCARIER!

    -Quick
     
    Quick, Jul 21, 2006
    #4
  5. Or, you might consider the biconvex "gag" glasses sold at Spencer
    Gifts, that look like that photo but have a net refractive power of
    Plano.
     
    doctor_my_eye, Jul 21, 2006
    #5
  6. acemanvx

    acemanvx Guest



    That is a possibily, albet very rare. Such people are born with
    unusually thick crystaline lenses, steep corneas and/or egg shaped
    eyes. What needs to be done is slow down the progression of myopia or
    pathalogies may occur in the retina and other parts.


    "Take a closer look. This child is wearing telescopic lenses, likely
    he
    has a congenital vision problem resulting in poor best corrected
    vision. These glasse allow him to read normal sized print instead of
    using braille."



    How does one differnate between very high minus myodiscs/lenticular and
    telescopic? If the glasses intent was to magnify, youd have to read
    very close and only see one word at a time.


    "Dear AceMan,


    That is what is going to happen to that 20/50 kid -- who was
    put into a -10 diopters -- for no good reason.


    I truly pity these poor kids -- and the consequence of that
    over-prescribed minus lens.


    Just one man's opinion."


    I extend my condolences too. Theres nothing sadder than seeing a poor
    kid in strong glasses with his head buried in a book. If anyone can see
    well enough to read without minus glasses, take them off! Those with so
    much myopia that its too inconvinent can either wear weaker glasses for
    near work or bifocals to controll myopia.
     
    acemanvx, Jul 22, 2006
    #6
  7. acemanvx

    otisbrown Guest

    Dear AceMan,

    Just remember this:

    When you see your own child, with his nose 4 inches off the page -- you
    are going to have to do eveything in your power to STOP that
    very bad HABIT.

    This becomes and EDUCATED parent's responsibility.

    If your kid's refractive STATE is zero at age five, you can
    almost guarantee that the child's refractive STATE will
    go down by about -1 diopter in two years.

    It is essential that you be aware of this fact (as the second-opinion)
    and be prepared to help your child in the use of the plus for
    prevention.

    If you take anything "away" from these discussions -- then that
    should become a large part of the "solution".

    So if a second-opinion OD says to you, "AceMan", I checked
    your child's refractive state. He has 20/20, but a +1/4 diopter
    lens "blurs" to 20/30."
    is clear that the un-protected eye will go down by
    about -1 diopter in two years.

    If you agree, then we can START your child in the
    preventive plus at this time. My professional
    charges will reflect in the time I spend with you.

    But the true "control" must rest with you and your
    child.

    Let me know what your choice is to be.

    I hope these discussions prepare you for that day -- and choice.

    Best,

    Otis
     
    otisbrown, Jul 23, 2006
    #7
  8. acemanvx

    Ann Guest

    Ace is unable to get a job.. do you really think he's going to have a
    family? I certainly hope not.

    Ann
     
    Ann, Jul 23, 2006
    #8
  9. acemanvx

    acemanvx Guest

    acemanvx, Jul 24, 2006
    #9
  10. acemanvx

    otisbrown Guest

    Or he could be a 3 year-old child with 20/50 vision (which is
    functional)
    who was put into a -10 diopter lens -- and told to wear it all the
    time.

    Best,

    Otis
     
    otisbrown, Jul 24, 2006
    #10
  11. acemanvx

    Quick Guest

    For what? You might avoid walking through a wall
    but probably fall down stairs a lot?

    -Quick
     
    Quick, Jul 24, 2006
    #11
  12. acemanvx

    otisbrown Guest

    Yes, that child (at 20/40 and 20/50) truly needed to be
    wearing a -10 diopter lens all the time. Yes,
    you are indeed "Quick".
     
    otisbrown, Jul 24, 2006
    #12
  13. acemanvx

    Quick Guest

    Ummm, lets see... first time you commented you
    speculated that the kid IN the picture could have
    been "at 2/50" wearing a -10. Now I see you have
    magically transmuted that into a statement of fact.
    Amazing. Did you get some secret inside information
    about this particular case?

    Or is it just magic. Kind of like the work you published
    on HUMAN eyes that you refuse to repeat or point to?

    hmmm, "transmutant". I like the sound of that.
    Otis, Transmutant Ingenue.

    -Quick
     
    Quick, Jul 24, 2006
    #13
  14. acemanvx

    acemanvx Guest



    putting someone at 20/50 in a -10 lens is malpractice and frankly with
    this much overcorrection, everything will be *very* blurry. I remember
    as a little boy I tried my moms glasses for a few seconds just to see
    what it was like and her -7 glasses made everything very, very blurry.
    Only a 2 or 3 year old can accomodate -10 glasses with 20/50 vision
    then go "down" at -3 diopters a year so in a few short years the -10
    glasses will be right and without glasses, their eyes have a -10
    refractive state! But fortunately most children dont get overprescribed
    and those that do, its by only a little. Still, any minus is bad.
     
    acemanvx, Jul 25, 2006
    #14
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